5 words you should eliminate from your professional vocabulary

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5 words you should eliminate from your professional vocabulary

Jessica Tabinor Career Advice

5 words you should eliminate from your professional vocabulary

    CAREER ADVICE | 4 MIN READ

  • Ensure that your choice of words reflects the very best version of you

  • We've listed 5 words you should avoid like the plague when you’re in a working environment

Did you know that your choice of words can influence other people’s perception of your professional abilities? Both in an interview and throughout your working career, you want to ensure that you’re not using words that could make you appear less confident or even capable than you are.

Whether it’s via email, on the phone or face to face, the words you choose are your opportunity to ensure that you’re being perceived in the exact way that you want.

To ensure that your choice of words reflects the very best version of you, we’ve listed 5 words you should avoid like the plague when you’re in a working environment…


Maybe

An absolute no-no in professional communication.

Maybe is defined in the dictionary as “a possibility or uncertainty”. Why would strive to be uncertain at work? Regardless of the topic, do the legwork and make sure you’re informed.


Honestly

In most situations, it’s not necessary to state that you’re being honest when replying to a question at work. Does that mean that your other statements and answers were not completely honest?

When you’re credible, you should be straightforward every time and no qualifier like 'honestly' is needed.


Things

To start sounding more credible and confident in professional situations and leave the word ‘things’ out of your sentences.

Things can be perceived as a valueless word and can be replaced easily with a more descriptive and meaningful expression.


Example:

“There are many things that make me a great candidate for this job”

“I am a great candidate for this job because of X,Y,Z” – State the things!

Hopefully

You shouldn’t ‘hope’ in the workplace, you should act and deliver.

Example:

“Hopefully we can catch up on Monday”

“I have booked a meeting for us to catch up on Monday. Let me know if that is ok with you” 


Stuff

Vagueness never goes down well in an office environment and if you want to give off the impression that you’re a subject matter expert, using ‘stuff’ as a describing word doesn’t really do you any justice. Be more specific with your answers and you will go far.


Above all, always remember that words are powerful and should be chosen and spoken with care. It will take some getting used to but once you’ve mastered this way of communicating, you’ll see how your choice of words not only makes your co-workers perceive you as a capable professional, but it will improve your self-confidence in the workplace.


Now you’re all set to ace that job interview and succeed in your new career! Search the opportunities with Morson here.