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Diversity and Inclusion

Diversity in Engineering

diversity in engineering

We sat down to talk to Major Projects Quality Director at Balfour Beatty, Amanda McKay, to discuss her varied career and the challenges she faces as a transgender woman >


EMMA JAYNE GOOCH Head of Supply Chain Development & Innovation at Sellafield explains why there should be more women at board level >

Inspirational People Breaking Barriers and Building Bridges

Morson prides itself on being an equal opportunities employer that provides an inclusive environment to candidates and employees alike. We believe that diversity of thought promotes
innovation by bringing multiple perspectives to discussions and decisions.

In 2017 we launched our women in engineering pledge to double the number of female contractors by 2020 (on Women in Engineering day 2017 this stood at 7.5% of our contractor population).

We regularly profile the success stories of females within our industry highlighting the wide variety of careers in engineering and importantly, changing the perception of our industry from that of a male-dominated one to an inclusive and change-making industry.

We have been privileged enough to interview some of the most talented women in the engineering industry, exploring their career paths, challenges and inspirations to highlight the careers available to the next generation. 

Latest articles

► Balfour Beatty's Amanda McKay Talks LGBT Diversity in Engineering

► Senior Systems Engineer at Thales, Estel Dandridge, Talks Us Through Her Involvement in Developing Aria Technology with Oman Air

► Morson Vital Training and the Girls Network spark engineering interest in a new generation of young people | #CareersOnTrack

►  Morson Sponsor the Big Rail Diversity Games

► Jet-setting Chemical Engineering Career Sees Anna Travel the World

  

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Get the latest ...

Our YouTube channel explores the varied career's of some of our industry's most inspiring individuals, or continue to our diversity and inclusion blog to get the latest thought leadership, videos and content. 


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    Digital Disruption: Project Design Authority Transforms In-flight Experiences

    Ivy Man is part of a team of highly skilled software engineers dedicated to revolutionizing the flying experience of Emirates’ customers as part of a four-year development programme with the aviation giant. Based out of Thales US’ Irvine, CA base, the Emirates Project Design Authority is spearheading the Engineering team working on the Boeing 777X aircraft; one of the largest projects that it has ever worked on. Ivy explains: “I can’t really say too much about the project due to confidentiality reasons, but what I will say is that the work we’re doing will transform the passenger experience of flying with Emirates; not just inflight but every touchpoint that the customer has before they even climb on board to after they’ve landed.” As design authority for the programme, its Ivy’s responsibility to define the scope and definition for the deliverables and different solutions, interface with engineers and programmers on the technical teams as well as manage budgets, resource planning, scheduling and more. “We’re approaching a critical stage of development so I’m frequently on conference calls and in meetings liaising with key stakeholders around the globe to ensure we’re all working collaboratively towards common goals, activities and deadlines,” continues Ivy. “There isn’t room for a traditional working day on this project as the 11-hour time difference with Emirates’ Dubai HQ can see me on calls from 7 am through to 9 pm.” Having moved to the US from Hong Kong aged 18, Ivy studied Mathematics at Boise State University, ID, before completing her Masters in Computer Science at the University of Colorado. Ivy continues: “Looking back, it really was my dad who has really inspired me to reach where I am today. Our family was never rich but he worked hard so I could come to the US for my education, and a lot of the traits and attributes that I have today, I value to him and his guidance.” Having first worked as a software engineer throughout various roles, Ivy joined Thales in 2005 as a Principal Software Engineer. Her 13-year career with the company has seen her take on various roles and progress throughout the business to her current position as Project Design Authority. Ivy added: “When I first joined Thales I was working in a very small defined area of software. As my knowledge and experience has grown, I’ve gained more of an understanding of the larger components to see how everything fits together and take on more responsibility as a bigger picture thinker." “This project is one of the most challenging that we’ve ever worked on here at Thales and it’s great that my 13-year career has led me to here. I love the complexity of the programme; I’m not only exposed to new areas and opportunities to learn but the demands pushes us to the next level to test and implement new technology and features that have never done before." “Every decision that I’ve made has led me to where I am today. You never know what new things you and your team are going to create and develop to make tasks better and I love this variety and the unknown of what the future holds.” Morson International is the UK's No.1 Aerospace Recruiter, with hundreds of jobs in aviation click here to find your next opportunity.

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    Morson on Target to Double Female Engineering Contractors by 2020

    Following last year’s pledge from Morson International to double the number of female engineering contractors that it employs by 2020, the top technical recruiter is on track to surpass its target. Current workforce ratios show that 13.8 per cent of all Morson’s engineering contractors are now female compared to 7.5 per cent this time last year; indicating that its commitment to creating a more diverse talent pool is paying dividends. With a number of major infrastructure projects now on site and progressing towards their peak, including HS2 and Hinkley Point C, the demand for engineers continues to outstrip supply. According to the Women’s Engineering Society, the UK needs to significantly increase the number of people with engineering skills, with estimates suggesting that we need to at least double the number who are already studying engineering-related subjects. Adrian Adair, operations director at Morson International, comments: “It’s inspiring to see significant progress made already. It’s crucial that we source the highly skilled workforce that the engineering sector needs, but it’s clear that as an industry, we need more diversity. By inspiring underrepresented groups, particularly women, as well as promoting opportunities that resonate with different races, ages, backgrounds, geographic locations and more, we hope to create a healthy talent pool for future engineering projects and one which is more diverse and more inclusive.” Morson recently held a #CareersOnTrack event, aimed at addressing the skills shortage and lack of diversity in the rail industry. The event saw girls aged 14-17 visit Morson Vital Training’s education hub in Salford, giving them the opportunity to step foot on its replica track and learn more about the rail industry and its various careers. As part of Morson’s pledge to ensure the modern workforce is more gender diverse by 2020, the recruiter is also supporting career switching by helping candidates outside of engineering recognise the transferable skills that they already possess for a successful career in the sector. Adrian continues: “Leveraging transferable skills opens up new opportunities across a choice of industries and locations, as well as presenting possible progression paths by capitalising on skills in high demand." “There are a number of similar stand out initiatives that are working to stamp out the stereotypes in engineering and wider STEM subjects, such as the IET’s #SmashStereotypesToBits, and it’s this collective drive and focus from throughout the industry that will encourage more diverse recruitment.” For more information on Morson’s Women in Engineering campaign, visit http://project.morson.com/women-in-engineering. Join the conversation using the hashtag #MorsonWiE

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    Balfour Beatty's Amanda McKay Talks LGBT Diversity in Engineering

    We sat down to talk to Major Projects Quality Director at Balfour Beatty, Amanda McKay, to discuss her varied career and the challenges she faces as a transgender woman. Amanda started her career with a passion for geology and after securing her degree she worked as a mining engineer. Her career trajectory took a turn as she then spent 15 years in the army serving in Northern Ireland and Iraq, followed by 22 years as a special constable. Years of wide and varied experience led back to her engineering roots and with Balfour Beatty she now specialises in nuclear new build developments. As Major Projects Quality Director she leads a team of engineers, working on some of the most innovative projects in the UK such as Hinkley Point C. Speaking about her decision to find the courage to become Amanda 5 years ago, we discussed the barriers she experienced with regards to job opportunities and her career prospects: “One of my biggest fears was that in transitioning I would basically put myself off the job market and my career would either stagnate or end.” Amanda discussed how she was faced with ‘a glass ceiling’ in her previous role, not only because she was transgender but because she was female. Attracting a more diverse employee demographic has become a major priority for many organisations, particularly those in traditionally male-dominated sectors such as engineering, nuclear, IT and construction. But the drive to improve gender balance has to go beyond lip service or diversity targets; it must be embedded in a company’s employment culture. She describes how she was unfairly confronted with rejected applications for many roles in the construction industry, even though she had unquestionable experience and dedication to her profession. I had a CV which I'd never failed to get at least an interview with. 20 jobs I've applied for in my life and I've got 15 of them, which I think is a pretty good strike rate. All of a sudden my CV didn't open doors. Interviews were more of a curiosity pitch and that was really really challenging. All of a sudden she was faced with a CV that instead of opening doors, unfortunately, had the opposite effect. That was until she decided to make the move and join Balfour Beatty. She explains: “On joining Balfour Beatty, I found they had a completely different attitude, they recruited me because of my skill set and for what I brought to the company.” We asked Amanda, what does inclusivity mean to you? “Really what it means is that everybody has a say, everybody is treated equally in an organisation and it doesn’t matter who they are or where they come from or how they identify, they are part of the team.” Looking forward, Amanda has a range of career ambitions and she talks to us about the opportunities that HS2 and Hinkley Point C will bring: Most of my work at the moment is around nuclear new-build of which there's really only one project in the UK (Hinkley Point C). If it gains a little bit more traction and the other projects start then I see myself as leading a larger team doing what I'm doing now probably on multiple new build projects. If it doesn't, I think we'll be moving back towards our core work around decommissioning nuclear projects. But I also now look after Balfour Beatty tunneling projects and our HS2 work as well, so I've got a number of strands not just doing nuclear as I did when I started with Balfour Beatty. HS2 will be an interesting project as will some of the tunnelling one. We're working on the Thames Tideway project in London which is currently a television show on BBC Two about the early years that's been challenging but very interesting. Morson is committed to creating a truly inclusive environment for all employees, clients and candidates. We’ve already signed the ‘Inclusive Culture Pledge’ developed by diversity consultancy, EW Group, to help companies of all kinds to focus on areas of their business that will help them create a stronger working environment where diversity and inclusivity are prioritised and empowered. The move is designed to help us continue to implement the positive continuous change needed to achieve our goal of doubling the number of female contractors we hire by 2020. Gender diversity in the workplace has come a long way since the era of the typing pool and the all-male boardroom but there’s still a long way to go. Even just starting conversations surrounding diversity in the workplace can go a long way into implementing the real change that is required. At Morson, we’re clearly focused on making that positive change happen, for our own business and our clients. Watch the full video to find out more about Amanda’s inspirational journey and her thoughts on diversity in the workplace. To get #MoreFromMorson including our latest updates, blogs and news follow @MorsonGroup on Twitter.

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    Improving Diversity in the Rail Industry | #SkillsOnTrack

    With Manchester Pride weekend around the corner, we take a closer look at Diversity in the Rail industry and the effect that improving diversity may have on the challenging skills gap. DIVERSITY IN RAIL HS2 will create sustainable job opportunities for local people, young people and those from diverse groups. Providing rewarding jobs and careers that are open to all in society, setting new standards for equality, diversity and inclusion and providing a legacy of skills, learning, expertise, and experience. Changing the perceptions of engineering and removing the barriers that people face, especially females, will make the workplace more inclusive, equal and deliver a stronger, more sustainable industry. Currently, just 4% of UK rail engineers are (Image sourced via Manchester Metrolink) female, the lowest rate in Europe. HS2 Ltd specifies a number of equality, diversity and inclusion (EDI) requirements that its supply chain must adopt including: Developing a diverse supply chain Advertising roles and supplier opportunities more widely Delivering tailored training opportunities Promoting workforce welfare Removing barriers to inclusive employment practices ​ The project aims to inspire groups traditionally lacking in STEM subjects and enable the take up of roles within the supply chain for local, diverse and under-represented groups. THE SOLUTION EDI is part of the solution to address the skills and talent shortage as a diverse workforce is proven to boost creativity, promote innovation and increase profitability. If we are to compete with other industries and attract the best talent then EDI must be at the heart of the decision-making processes of the entire supply chain, not just the few. We already employ a number of techniques to improve diversity and inclusion within Morson International and those of our clients including unconscious bias training for our recruitment teams and CV anonymisation. Download our whitepaper to read more about the solutions that are needed if we are to achieve HS2’s vision of being a catalyst for growth across Britain. Or click here to find your opportunity on HS2.

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    VolkerWessels UK's Hollie Woodard Talks Diversity In Engineering

    As part of our diversity in engineering series, Morson spoke to Hollie Woodard, Head of Equality, Diversity and Inclusion at VolkerWessels UK. Hollie started her career in rail administration but has changed multiple times since, moving into commercial and a quantity surveyor role and then project management. She reflects on the state of the industry and how things have developed since she started: "When I started, there were definitely less women in senior roles, so for me there weren't many role models for people who were in roles other than admin or support roles. That's starting to change. In some of our businesses we've got a female head of engineering, a female pre-contracts director. So seeing those people in those roles is something that's definitely changed over the years. We're also seeing more females come in through the apprenticeship and graduate route. For example, in our VolkerRail business we've got female apprentices who are studying the overhead line discipline." Hollie started her current role in October 2017. It wasn't a role that existed at the company initially, but she worked with the senior management team and directors within the business to devise a role that she felt was required within the business. "A typical day involves a lot of liasing with other departments like HR, the bid teams, our directors, business MD's and also learning and development. We're looking at the strategy tat we want to implement and how we might want to roll that out to each business unit." With her career being so varied, Hollie has had to draw on a lot of different skills at different times. When asked what the key skill or attribute required for her current role, she says: "Passion. If you're passionate, it helps you with the role, helps you deliver it and also explain why it's important to other people. My previous role as a project manager in the rail industry, being often the only female in meetings or on site, has helped me really want to have that passion for wanting to make the picture look quite different in the future. People skills are always useful, along with communication skills. A lot of the new role involves explaining to people and communicating to people in different ways about what the benefit might be to them and to the business and helping them understand that." Hollie sees her newly created role as one of many steps towards building a different, more diverse working culture. "We recognise as an industry we need to do things differently. We recognise that we've not got enough people coming into the industry to futureproof and deliver the projects of the future. How can we do things differently to attract people to our industry as a career of choice? There are some campaigns that we're doing with our regular recruitment partners looking at how we change our job adverts, looking at how we change the language in our job adverts for example. That might be things like using gender neutral language, making sure we're not specifying if we need certain years experience to attract more people that might be put off by that." Hollie would ideally like to see like to see her role become almost not requried in terms of trying to bring more females into the industry, but still sees its inception as a new position one of her real highlights: My biggest achievement in my career would probably be having this role approved by the board! This role didn't exist this time last year and it was a real step change for us to have this position, so to be able to approach the board and be able to ask them to let me drive this forward for our business was a real achievement for me. In additon to that as a project manager and quantity surveyor, earlier on in my career I was recognised by Women in Rail as one of the 20 most inspirational women in rail, which was lovely because I was nominated by my peers. In 2017 I was also shortlisted for the Northern Power Women 'One to Watch' category.

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    Making Diversity Synonymous With Success

    Soon to mark 50 years in business, much of Morson International’s journey from a bedroom-born recruiter established in 1969 to a global leader in technical sectors, rests on our ability to remain agile and adapt to the evolving needs of our clients, contractors, candidates and employees. Equality, diversity and inclusion (ED&I) remain hot topics, especially when analysing representation, or the often thereby lack of, at the top, and we’re working hard to ensure that ED&I becomes part of the norm by changing the conversation. A lack of diversity has created an imbalance in many of the sectors that we operate in, such as engineering, aerospace, IT, rail, nuclear and construction, and we’ve witnessed first-hand how females, LGBTQ+ and ethnic minorities have been underrepresented, particularly at senior level. Change is Coming Within our own business, we strive to ensure that our workforce represents our customers and society as a whole, which means recruiting from the widest talent pool possible and giving our people the tools, drivers and learning opportunities to thrive and reach their full potential, from entry through to board level. We are ferociously challenging stereotypes to build diverse workforces that drive innovative ideas, change the status quo and raise the bar for success. Including inclusivity as one of our core company values ensures that we do everything possible to provide a fair, open and equal culture from the top down and bottom up so that ED&I touches every part of what we do. We also excel in the levels of diversity amongst our senior management and to ensure our board of the future replicates this same forward-thinking approach to talent irrespective of their gender, race, sexuality, age, religion and belief, and more, we run an ongoing mentoring programme with our leaders who possess the drive to reach the top. Diversity breeds innovation, productivity and drives commercial earnings, and we work in partnership with a number of our clients to champion their own ED&I programmes, by giving everyone a voice and developing cultures that embrace change and outperform their peers. The Diversity and Leadership Exchange Maintaining an equal, diverse and inclusive workforce is part of Morson International’s DNA. As one of the most respected names in recruitment, we’ve built a business that delivers excellence for our employees, candidates, contractors and clients. Improving diversity, particularly in leadership positions, is good for business, yet many technical sectors still lack gender and ethnic diversity at senior level. We’re hosting a unique panel event which brings together world-class leaders from various professions and industries to share their own stories and insights on leadership behaviours to create inclusive cultures, lead successfully diverse teams and develop environments where all staff can thrive and reach their full potential. Our panel includes: Anna Delveccio, FTA Everywomen Transport and Logistics Woman of the Year 2018. A champion for women in transport who began her illustrious engineering career aged just 15 and by her early 30s, was already appointed commercial account director for infrastructure giant, Amey Alex Rodick, client account manager at Stonewall, Europe’s largest LGBT charity. Alex's focus is on supporting the professional services industry to increase LGBT diversity in the workplace and ensure that individuals can reach their full potential. Simone Roche (MBE), CEO & Founder of Northern Power Women, Simone launched Northern Power Women out of a passion to connect and engage with people about gender equality. Adrian Adair, operations director, Morson International, Adrian is a major driving force behind Morson International’s diversification into new markets and transforming the brand into a global specialist in permanent and interim talent-based solutions. To achieve this, he has identified the future boardroom, ensuring it’s diverse, equal and inclusive. ​ We will be releasing the findings of the event in a video and write up which hopes to uncover the latest trends affecting business and how current and future leaders can navigate these issues to create more diverse teams that are engaged, productive and innovative, and ultimately drive business objectives. Show Your Support Tweet us using the hashtag #DiversityinLeadership and tag in @MorsonGroup

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    Almost Half of Employees With Mental Health Issues Hide It From Colleagues

    We recently surveyed our contractor workforce and found that almost half (46%) of employees living with a mental health condition do not inform their employer, with more than a third (39%) saying that they feared their reaction and the repercussions. Other reasons cited included not being comfortable telling the individual (59%), the stigma around mental health (42%) and the lack of support in the workplace (22%); with 55% saying they were either unaware of any support available or that their workplace lacked in any assistance for mental illness. The same survey of 1,400 respondents, which comprised 80% males aged 41+ working within sectors such as construction, professional services, IT, digital, engineering and rail, revealed that 1 in 5 (21%) had experienced a mental health problem and of those, 62% were either seeking treatment or had sought treatment in the past. Almost 1 in 10 (9%) of all respondents had also at some point considered taking their own life, revealing that their mental health issue had left them feeling suicidal. Adrian Adair, operations director at Morson International, said: “These results are shocking and unacceptable. There’s still a major disconnect between mental health awareness and openness at work, which means people are still uncomfortable discussing the subject due to fear of what their employer may think or the risk of them losing their job altogether. “Too many people are suffering in silence, which can often result in people having time off work. Four of the respondents said they were off work for more than a year as a result of their mental illness, which will have had a significant impact on their employer in lost productivity. “Safety is paramount in many of the sectors that these respondents operate in and whilst their employers take great strides in protecting their people from physical harm, the same effort is needed to address mental ill health. We need to stamp out the taboos by developing open and honest cultures that are supplemented with better support and training to help sport the early signs of mental ill health. Male dominated sectors are less comfortable discussing mental health, which is why it is crucial that we create environments where anyone can voice their concerns without fear.” We have taken practical steps to tackle these issues, training a handful of staff across the business in becoming ‘mental health first aiders’, who now possess the practical skills to spot the signs of mental illness within our workforce, including our contractors and the confidence to intervene and support those in need. Our objective is to bolster our mental health first aiders over the coming months to have multiple trained operatives located across each of its key regions. Adrian adds: “We’ve prioritised mental ill health within our own business and developed meaningful and impactful mental, emotional and physical wellbeing programmes to support our staff and help them to thrive; and we hope other employers take inspiration from what we’ve done to spark their own initiatives.” To mark World Mental Health Day, we have released a new whitepaper highlighting workplace mental health and the steps employers can take to create a happier, healthier and more productive workforce. The whitepaper includes more insights from our contractor survey supported by powerful personal stories of our own employee's and ex-Morson sponsored boxer Ricky Hatton. To download, visit www.morson.com/tackling-mental-health

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    Do Men Feel Included or Excluded in the Push to Increase Diversity? | Masculinity in Engineering Survey

    EqualEngineers is launching its first survey investigating masculinity in engineering, a first-of-its-kind for the sector. The survey will be open for 5 weeks, closing on 16th November 2018. Engineering and technology in the UK is a predominately male profession, with men comprising over 89% of the workforce. Many diversity efforts pivot on getting more women into engineering. This survey will explore if the culture of engineering is affected by the stereotype of what an engineer looks like, and how men are expected to behave. Do men feel included or excluded in the push to increase diversity? Could a more diverse profession benefit both women and men? Suicide is the biggest killer of men under 50, with male construction workers 3.7 times more likely to take their own life. Are men able to be open about their mental health challenges, or is the stigmatisation too great? Does this manifest itself as a macho culture in the workplace or on-site which prevents an inclusive culture? This survey would like to know your views and opinions - the real ones, not the ones that you feel that you should express. We expect respondents to give us their real answers, not just the "right" answers. The survey is the brainchild of Dr Mark McBride-Wright, Managing Director of EqualEngineers, who set the company up after years of working in the sector and seeing not only the challenges that the lack of diversity can bring, but also the risks posed to health, safety and wellbeing. Being a gay safety engineer himself, and setting up networking group InterEngineering for LGBT+ engineers gave him the drive to set up an organisation covering all aspects of diversity. Mark says: “For me, inclusivity in the workplace is a health and safety issue. Not being able to be open about who you are, because of attitudes and lack of diversity around you can lead to mental health issues and decreased wellbeing. In Construction, for example, an industry where suicide rates among men are more than three times the national average, more needs to be done to ensure that commitment to these issues goes much further than token inclusion policies. My hopes for this survey is to capture the voice of men in the engineering and tech industries, individuals who perhaps feel excluded from the focus on diversity and inclusion efforts of organisations. We need to rapidly overhaul the way in which we approach culture change programmes within our industry, and we need to ensure everyone feels included, and is able to find their voice as part of the diversity narrative.” Ian Childs, Executive Manager, Morson International says: “As the UK’s No.1 Technical Recruiter, Morson engages with a huge engineering community. Our business has taken great strides to improve the diversity of our contractor population, doubling the number of female engineers we employ. Now it’s time to look deeper and assess how these cultural changes affect the workforce as a whole. The stigma around mental health keeps too many people silent. Safety is paramount in many of the sectors that we operate in and whilst employers take great strides in protecting their people from physical harm, the same effort is now needed to address mental ill health. We are pleased to be supporting EqualEngineers in this study.” Initial results from the EqualEngineers Masculinity in Engineering Survey will be reported on International Men’s Day on 19th November. For more information, visit http://bit.ly/EEMasculinitySurvey. To take survey directly, visit https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/EqEngMasculinitySurvey.

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    Attracting and Retaining the Best Talent with a Strong Employer Brand

    At Morson we firmly believe that the biggest driver of a business' success is its people. Therefore, attracting and retaining the best talent should be a top priority for every business. Competition in the recruitment industry is fierce and taking advantage of your employer brand is a key way to differentiate yourself in a crowded marketplace. A strong employer brand allows you to portray a sense of who you are as an employer, what makes you the best company to work for, what it's like to work for your company and how you value your employees. By consistently and creatively showcasing what makes your business great, you will reduce the time to hire, reduce recruitment costs and hire relevant and high-quality candidates. "TODAY OVER 59% OF EMPLOYERS SAY THAT EMPLOYER BRANDING REPRESENTS ONE OF THE KEY COMPONENTS OF THE ORGANISATION'S OVERALL HR STRATEGY" With a growing skills-for-job culture and a shift to replace the outdated job-for-life model, the job market is becoming much more agile and flexible, and candidates expectations of a company are moving in parallel. In addition, with unemployment rates at a record low in the UK, Europe and the US, its never been easier to secure a job and the most talented individuals have serious power in choosing their next career move. In having that choice, candidates have the opportunity to question why they should choose to apply for or continue to work for your company. Starting from inside your organisation Setting out your employer value proposition (EVP) and bringing it to life starts from inside your organisation. Outline what an employee receives from your company in exchange for their talents. The benefits we are talking about here aren’t things like medical insurance or holidays. "EVERYONE CONNECTED WITH THE GROUP FEELS PART OF THE 'MORSON FAMILY', IT'S THIS CULTURE OF INCLUSIVITY THAT SITS AT THE HEART OF ALL OF OUR EMPLOYER BRANDING. MORSON HAS A PROGRAMME OF STRUCTURED TRAINING, COACHING AND MENTORING, RAISING THE EMPLOYABILITY OF OUR WORKFORCE BY BUILDING SKILLS AND COMPETENCIES IN BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT AND PROMOTING PERSONAL GROWTH. CONTINUING TO INVEST TIME, MONEY AND RESOURCE MAXIMISES INDIVIDUALS' ABILITIES, LAYS THE FOUNDATION FOR HIGHLY SUCCESSFUL CAREERS AND CREATES A COMBINED DESIRE FOR EXCELLENCE ACROSS THE GROUP AND ITS WIDER NETWORK" - BECKI ROSS, HEAD OF HR AT MORSON GROUP Refine benefit structures such as career development, community involvement, leadership etc. and deliver this brand experience in your employee’s day to day life through training, development and reward programmes. These attributes can play a huge part in differentiating you from your competitors and attracting top talent. Want to know more about how you can increase retention and attract top talent for your business? We've created an #EmployerBranding Guide to help you do just that. Get your copy here.

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    "75% of Job Seekers Consider an Employer's Brand Before Applying for a Job" | Our 10 Step Checklist for Creating a Strong Employer Brand

    An employer brand showcases an organisation as an employer. Creating an employer brand and promoting your company as an employer of choice positions you to attract, recruit and retain your ideal employee’s. Creating an employer brand is about showing candidates what your company can offer. Practically, it can be a powerful business tool to create a more productive workforce and position your organisation for long-term success. Employer branding is no longer an option for businesses, it’s a must. Digitalisation now means that candidates can easily get an impression of your business through a wide variety of networks and platforms. Your employer brand is a window into your business and should clearly embody your organisation's values and culture in order to attract top talent. Regardless of the sector that you operate in or the size of your company, creating an engaging employer brand will significantly help when it comes to hiring new staff and retaining your best talent. "75% OF JOB SEEKERS CONSIDER AN EMPLOYER’S BRAND BEFORE THEY EVEN APPLY TO AN OPPORTUNITY WITH THE COMPANY." We've put together a 10 step checklist for creating a strong employer brand: 1. Use social media to promote your brand. 2. Listen to employee feedback and implement change. 3. Ensure branding and anything customer facing is consistent and aligned with your brand values. 4. Engage with your customers regularly, whether that be via email, blogs, announcements or traditional methods. 5. Reply to your customer's queries, remember the customer is always right. 6. Don't dismiss review sites like Glassdoor, potential candidates look at them and form opinions. 7. Invest in leadership development within your organisation to ensure consistency from the top. 8. Embrace diversity and inclusivity to create an inclusive culture where each employee feels that they are valued and can contribute is key to business success. 9. Value your employees. 10. Keep up to date with current industry trends to stay ahead of the competition. Want to know more about how you can increase retention and attract top talent for your business? We've created an #EmployerBranding Guide to help you do just that. Get your copy here.

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    Morson Partner with EngineeringUK to Deliver Inspiring Social Mobility Event

    Morson was proud to partner with Engineering UK and the University of Salford at the latest Engineering Connections ‘Spotlight on Social Mobility’ event this week. The event sought to explore why individuals from disadvantaged backgrounds are underrepresented in engineering occupations, making up just 24% of the workforce. EngineeringUK’s first event out of London was a huge success, featuring talks from leading experts in the field of social mobility (including Morson’s own Andy Robinson and Gerry Mason Scholar Muhtaba Ghulam) and interesting debate which could have carried on well into the afternoon. Hosted by Mark Tittering, CEO of EngineeringUK, the speakers included: Dr Lindsay Richards, Centre for Social Investigation at Nuffield College Andy Robinson, Training Support Manager at Morson Vital Training Phil East, CEO Salford Foundation Mujtaba Ghulam, Engineering Student at the University of Salford Andy from Morson Vital Training passionately spoke of the work that he himself and Morson as a wider group undertake to support social mobility. As the lead for the level 2 rail engineering apprenticeship programme, Andy plays an instrumental role in the development and continuous improvement of young people through apprenticeships. With a background in education, he also outlined his work in schools as an Enterprise Advisor with GMCA, where he works closely with the schools to improve their careers provision. Stressing the importance of engaging with children who may have limited aspirations due to the communities they live in, Andy outlined that it is within schools where most impact can be made. By making them aware of the opportunities available and providing them with routes to employment and role models to look up to, Andy aims to build the next generation of engaged and motivated professionals. In one such activity, Morson Vital Training hosted the Girls Network, for a #careersontrack event where students from St Ambrose School visited their rail training facility in Salford. The year 10 and 12 pupils from St Ambrose spent an afternoon gaining practical experience of rail safety and skills and exploring opportunities in engineering. Positively, many of the girls came away from the event considering apprenticeships in the engineering world. For many, the event ‘opened their eyes’ to engineering and for one pupil the event has spurred her on to realising her dream to become a construction engineer and encourage more women into the profession. Read more about this initiative here. Andy also discussed our target to double the number of female contractors by 2020 and being part of the 5% club charter where we strive to get 5% of our workforce in ‘earn and learn’ positions within five years of joining. He also spoke about the work that Morson do to support the Armed Forces, having recruited 1,220 ex-forces personnel in the last 12 months. We heard from Mujtaba, an engineering student at the University of Salford who explained how the Gerry Mason Scholarship, part of a pledge of £270,000 which enables talented young people who would otherwise be deterred from university because of costs, to pursue an engineering degree, has given him the opportunity to achieve his dream of becoming a Chartered Engineer. Reflecting on the event, Andy said: “It was a pleasure to attend and be a speaker at the EngineeringUK event on Social Mobility. The wide spectrum of organisations represented demonstrate there is a real appetite in industry at the moment to make the difference and help people from all walks of life reach their potential, whilst securing engineering infrastructure projects for years to come.” If you would like to learn more about Morson’s Apprenticeship programme, click here. Or, to read more about our charity involvement, click here.

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    Could Robots be the Key to Eliminating Unconscious Bias in Recruitment?

    Recent studies reveal that there is still a considerable way to go to eliminating gender bias from the recruitment process, especially in the engineering sector. According to the latest figures from the Women’s Engineering Society (WES), only 11% of the UK’s engineering workforce is female. Both women and men who study Engineering and Technology express similar levels of intent to work in the industry, however, 66.2% of men and only 47.4% of women went on to work in engineering and technology in 2011. Launched earlier this month, a robot called Furhat has set out on a mission to try and combat this issue. Advanced technology enables him to communicate with humans by listening, speaking, showing emotions and participating in conversations. The market-ready robot has been designed to create an intuitive, human-like and engage experience making the way that people interact with technology much more natural. (Image sourced via furhatrobotics.com) In an interview for Recruiter Magazine, Samer Al Moubayed, CEO of furhatrobotics.com said: "We know that about 70% of interviews for jobs are biased, bias comes from the state of mind of the recruiter when they enter the interview. So potentially the appearance, the age and the background, dialect, accent of the job candidate – things that we know shouldn’t be taken into account in an interview process but with humans are naturally biased. We’re trying to explore this exact question of how a robot can contribute to this area." It is believed that the technology firm is exploring the use of Furhat to complete competency-based interviews in the initial stages of the recruitment process. He will be able to ask the questions and then collect all the data to be able to pass on to a specialist recruiter to review, therefore removing the unconscious bias at the beginning of the recruitment process. Samer added: “The goals of the project are really global, the first language this system is going to cover is Swedish but we’re going to roll out English quite early in the process. The goal is to see if this can be turned into a product for staffing companies in Sweden and globally.” Watch the video below to find out more about Furhat. (Video sourced via furhatrobotics.com) Ready to progress your career? Click here to search Morson jobs

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