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Diversity and Inclusion

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For more videos exploring the careers of our inspiring female clients and co-workers visit our dedicated Women in Industry YouTube channel. Or join the conversion on LinkedIn.  Our group is a place to share knowledge, inspire change and shout about success, no matter what industry or sector you work in.

Welcome to the Morson diversity portal where you can find insights on attracting all generations recruitment, tips to be more successful and guides to inclusive leadership. We are committed to changing perceptions within business, championing women in engineering and empowering young talent through mentorship.

Adrian Adair, Operations Director at Morson, articluates why we're diversity and inclusion is core to Morson:

“There’s no denying that diversity achieves better commercial results by driving innovative ideas, changing the status quo and raising the bar for success. Yet it isn’t just as easy as attracting talent from underrepresented groups, as a business must also create working environments that champion equality and inclusivity from the inside out.

“We strive to ensure that our workforce represents our customers and society as a whole, which means recruiting from the widest talent pool and giving our people the tools, drivers and learning opportunities to reach their full potential, from entry to board level.

“We’re the only recruiter to commit to a target for increasing the number of female contractors that we employ and are using our own business as a sounding board to perfect our diversity initiatives and challenge stereotypes, so these can be rolled out to our clients to develop cultures that embrace change and ultimately outperform their peers.”

Diversity Champions

We are proud to be members of Stonewalls Diversity Champions programme. Stonewall are Europe's largest lesbian, gay, bi and trans (LGBT) charity. Diversity Champions is the leading employers' programme for ensuring all LGBT staff are accepted without exception in the workplace.

Morson aim to create a workplace where LGBT staff can be themselves, driving performance, engagement and innovation.  Through our involvement with Stonewall we aim to collaborate, learn and share cutting edge best practice and initiatives to enhance our ability to recruit diverse talent.

Inclusive Culture Pledge

 Here at Morson we are committed to improving the diversity of our company and building inclusive cultures every day. Not only is this good for business, it’s also the right thing to do.     We aim to be a truly 21st century workforce, where everyone’s talents are welcomed, valued and nurtured.

 As part of this we are committing to the Inclusive Culture Pledge, a special initiative by diversity consultancy EW Group.  By signing up to EW Group’s Pledge, we will benefit from a year  of dedicated support on five key aspects of diversity development: Leadership, People, Brand, Data and Future. Together this will provide a focus for building our skills, awareness,  confidence and maturity around workplace diversity over the course of 2018. In doing so, we are making a commitment, internally and outwardly, to the lasting importance of diversity and inclusion to our company culture. For more information visit https://theewgroup.com

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Our diversity and inclusion blog delivers the latest thought leadership, videos and content

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    Morson and J Murphy & Sons Proudly Sponsor Women in Rail #TransformTheFuture Event

    DIVERSITY & INCLUSION | 3 MIN READ Morson was delighted to sponsor the Women in Rail #TransformTheFuture event last month. Representatives from J Murphy & Sons spoke about how they made tangible improvements to their policies, working environments and marketing collateral to deliver an inclusive and accessible working environment. In partnership with J Murphy & Sons, Morson was delighted to sponsor the Women in Rail #TransformTheFuture event last month. To celebrate International Women in Engineering Day, Women in Rail’s North West Group welcomed like-minded attendees to the Science and Industry Museum in Manchester to promote great initiatives and share ideas to encourage more women to consider a career in engineering and construction. Organised by Women in Rail’s North West branch representatives; Jennifer McKinney, Head of Rail Infrastructure at Keolis Amey Metrolink, Daniela Cardoso, Senior Earthworks Asset Engineer at Network Rail and Claire Cronin, Head of Access & Integration at J Murphy & Sons. Representatives from J Murphy & Sons spoke about how they made tangible improvements to their policies, working environments and marketing collateral to deliver an inclusive and accessible working environment. These changes included the use of diverse imagery across all J Murphy & Son’s media, CV anonymisation and unconscious bias training. Their London head office even has gender-neutral toilets. Alastair Smyth, Managing Director of Engineering and Specialist Businesses, at J Murphy & Sons reinforced how it will be the collective force of organisations which will help to realise transformational change within the engineering and construction industry. In turn, we will deliver and retain diverse workforces which are representative of the communities in which they serve. Key learnings Inspiring future generations There is a lot being done by organisations to inspire future generations into STEM. The Girls’ Network, an organisation which inspires and empowers young women from disadvantaged communities by connecting them with a mentor and a network of leading female role models, encouraged attendees to get involved with their mentoring scheme. The importance of role modelling, highlighted by the Girl’s Network and Women Who Wonder, was reiterated by many of the panel members. Personal accounts from both panel’s detailed the positive and negative influence that female peers and those in senior leadership teams can have, demonstrating that role models are essential at every stage of a young person’s career. Role modelling will play an essential role in helping to encourage a diverse, next generation of talent into engineering, particularly considering that children in reception classes now could be working on the second phase of HS2. The wider talent pool Secondly, management as a skill is so important. It isn’t necessarily the best technical person who is best equipped to lead a team. This demonstrates the need to look at the whole talent pool to address the skills shortage, not just emergent talent (school and university leavers). It’s essential for companies to think about implementing mid-career apprenticeships, returner programmes and training which focuses on the individual if the industry wants to attract and retain a diverse workforce. We need to promote positive action to widen the available talent pool such as introducing inclusive PPE, diverse imagery, gender-neutral language, clean welfare vans and most importantly, educate our co-workers about changing team dynamics as the makeup of their team changes. TOP BLOG | From Girl Guides to Diversity Champion | Sorrel Chats About Her Aspirations, Maintaining a Work/Life Balance and Her Career in A Male-Dominated Industry Commenting on the success of the event, Gary Smithson, Associate Director said: “What really struck me about this great event was the diversity of the audience with regards to gender split (60/40 female to male) and age range. For us, promoting role models and profiling successful women in the industry is a key factor in creating a more diverse workforce and inspiring future generations. I have seen first-hand a shift in the recognition of diversity amongst organisations, which is hopefully a signifier of real change." For more information on Morson's commitment to diversity check out our Inclusive Role Models series. Or to find your next opportunity search jobs here.

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    Is enough being done to lower the gender gap in tech roles?

    DIVERSITY & INCLUSION | 5 MIN READ Diversity, equality and inclusion are three codes that the tech industry is yet to crack. Currently, just 17% of tech roles are filled by women, with the sector. We take a look at some company-wide culture changes that will set the standard of what tech companies can be doing to address and stamp out the issue of gender inequality. Diversity, equality and inclusion are three codes that the tech industry is yet to crack. Currently, just 17% of tech roles are filled by women, with the sector suffering a lack of representation from hard to reach groups and communities, including different races, sexualities and those from disadvantaged backgrounds. Last year, Morson hosted a ‘Gender Balance in Tech’ (GBiT) event in partnership with the University of Salford. The event brought together professionals and innovators from Manchester Airport Group (MAG), Siemens, BBC, Women in the Law UK and Think Money Group. The discussion panel concluded that gender imbalance in the tech industry is affecting most UK businesses, with all parties in agreement that diversity is a present-day issue and that if we don’t make big changes today, the UK PLC will decline from a dip in productivity, profits and commercial ability. This is particularly true of the ongoing issue of gender wage inequality, so we decided to investigate this further… Getting technical - the gender pay gap differences A report from Wired last year highlights the big tech companies in the UK and how what they’ve achieved for wage clarity. Meanwhile, in America, job site Glassdoor reported on the problems in its gender pay gap report. As the latter notes: “With global attention on the gender pay gap over the past three years, has progress been made to close the gap? This research examines how gender pay gaps have changed in the United States, United Kingdom, France, Germany, and Australia since our initial study in 2016. The 2019 study offers new gender pay gap data on Canada, the Netherlands, and Singapore and leverages hundreds of thousands of salary reports.” So, as you can see, this is a global issue. It’s also an essential one to address longstanding industry inequality. That’s an outlook not helped by Wired’s April 2019 report, as it confirmed: “Apple’s figures from last year revealed that women earned a median of 76p for every £1 men earned.” Clearly, enough isn’t being done to challenge this issue. Although tech companies are often thought of as progressive places to work, the industry needs to address the ongoing issues of wage inequality. Addressing the problem Organisations can take practical steps with regards to talent attraction to start addressing the issue: Recruitment practices: Develop a hiring strategy to address the understanding of the gender pay gap issue. Businesses can then show what they’ve done about it. Train your staff: Ensure that line managers are aware they need to treat their subordinates equally. Salary transparency: Have an open policy in departments about who earns what. It can also make it clear a business doesn’t tolerate wage disparity. A word on culture… Improve your company culture: Have a policy of openness that encourages employees to see each other as equals, rather than based on who earns what. At the GBiT event, Chris Joynson, talent & resourcing partner at MAG explained that in the industry technology has evolved quicker than commerce and many businesses still expect certain standards. “All organisations want superstars and not enough are taking chances on excellent candidates with plenty of ability and will, who can be taught the required technical skills. There are lots of capable and unemployed developers, for example, who are being overlooked by organisations. At MAG, certain departments still look for candidate backgrounds, for example, finance requires its team to have experience in one of the ‘Big Four’ accountancy firms; something we’re working to address.” Implementing company-wide culture changes such as these will set the standard of what tech companies can be doing to address and stamp out the issue of gender inequality. Encouraging women to start up in tech It is clear that diversity fosters greater success and profitability and that the lack of women in tech roles is an issue that needs addressing today. At GBiT MBE Leanne Cooke, CEO and founder of Evolve-IT Consultants examined gender bias and how the root of the problem begins at birth. “Boys are more inclined to be interested in STEM subjects because they tend to grow up with scientific toys, whereas girls are given kitchens and pink things,” explains Leanne. “As soon as they reach primary school, they already have an awareness of gender bias because of the toys they’ve grown up with and these perceptions are rarely challenged by their teachers.” “We need to change the mentality of young people to embrace technical interests and aspirations, which requires more input from teachers. Young people learn about IT and technology in schools, but they don’t see what careers are available beyond the games and devices.” However, whilst apprenticeships are great and more must be done to promote the benefits to young people, their parents and businesses, there’s still the immediate problem of the present-day skills gap. Several techniques can be applied quickly and easily by tech businesses to encourage greater diversity within the workplace. Mentoring and role modelling: Coaching employees through a business can start with apprenticeships. Training women from a young age can bring about employee loyalty and encourage Offer mentoring programmes to encourage women to engage with the tech industry at an early age. The concept of ‘seeing is believing’ is extremely powerful, with studies showing that female students are more likely to choose a particular career when they have been exposed to scenarios where they can imagine themselves in their shoes. By providing relatable role models to the younger generation to look up to, and take inspiration from, organisations can break down barriers and encourage more women into the field. Advertise appropriately: The way businesses phrase job specs should aim to encourage inclusivity, click here to access Glassdoor’s guide to removing gender bias from job descriptions. In addition, don’t let age be a barrier—the business world should encourage all ages to apply for tech roles. Contributors: This article was written in partnership with Peninsula Group Ready to start your tech career? Search our latest opportunities in tech here. Or, if you would like to find out more about our commitment to diversity and inclusion, click here to visit our diversity hub.

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    The European Space Agency and Barbie team up to encourage girls into space

    INDUSTRY NEWS | AEROSPACE | 4 MIN READ The European Space Agency (ESA) and Barbie have collaborated to showcase the achievements of Samantha Cristoforetti, the only active female astronaut in Europe. The campaign will begin with a number of motivational videos being released, in which Ms Cristoforetti will show young girls from the UK, Germany, France and Italy around the ESA European Astronaut centre in Cologne. Get inspired by our ‘Inclusive Role Models’ series which uses video and written interviews to showcase inspirational people from all walks of life, across industries such as engineering, technology and sport. The European Space Agency (ESA) and Barbie have collaborated to showcase the achievements of Samantha Cristoforetti, the only active female astronaut in Europe. The doll aims to spark the imagination of the next generation of astronauts, space scientists and aeronautical engineers to encourage young girls into the space industry. The new initiative forms part of the toy brand’s Dream Gap Project, an on-going initiative with the goal of closing the “dream gap” – a phenomenon that refers to the combination of barriers that impede girls from achieving their dreams or reaching their full potential. Isabel Ferrer, European Director of Marketing for Barbie, said: “We are proud to launch this collaboration with the ESA with a clear goal: to inspire girls to become the next generation of astronauts, engineers and space scientists.” “Barbie has always shown girls that they can be anything, giving them the opportunity to interpret different roles through play and embark on countless number of careers encouraging imagination and self-expression.” “We know how important it is for girls to have role models and this new ESA collaboration helps us to take this to an astronomical new level.” The campaign will begin with a number of motivational videos being released, in which Ms Cristoforetti will show girls from the UK, Germany, France and Italy around the ESA European Astronaut centre in Cologne. (Images sourced via ESA/Mattel) To accompany this, the ESA is planning to produce kids-targeted content on Barbie’s YouTube channel which will showcase Ms Cristoforetti’s achievements in space. As part of the partnership, Barbie also commissioned a report to try and gauge parental attitudes and knowledge around STEM subjects. The survey of 2000 parents revealed that 80% admitted that they lacked the basic knowledge of STEM careers. To address this, Barbie and the ESA have released a set of helpful STEM career tips for parents and guardians to both understand and teach their children that there are many career opportunities in STEM-related fields. Ersilia Vaudo-Scarpetta, Chief Diversity Officer for ESA, said: “The European Space Agency is strongly engaged in promoting girls’ interest in STEM subjects and space careers in particular, as we need a diversity of talents to imagine and enable the future in space.” “We are therefore proud to launch ESA’s collaboration with Barbie, highlighting inspiring role models as the astronauts and encouraging girls to believe in themselves, look at the sky and dream high.” Although astronaut Barbie doll isn’t available to purchase, Samantha Cristoforetti has been presented with a one-of-a-kind doll, representing her in her spacesuit. However, the ESA has suggested that we can ‘never say never’ as the collaboration is long-term, meaning there could be the opportunity to develop a doll in the future. Morson’s Inclusive Role Models Operating in traditionally male-dominated sectors, Morson has long been a vocal contributor to the diversity conversation. Our ‘Inclusive Role Models’ campaign uses video and written interviews to showcase inspirational people from all walks of life, across industries such as engineering, technology and sport. To get inspired by our role models series, click here to read, watch and absorb the interviews and stories. Our aim is to showcase the achievements of relatable role models to the younger generation in order for them to take inspiration and look up to. We hope to #TransformTheFuture by breaking down barriers and encourage a wider talent pool into the industry; whilst also providing a positive platform to encourage career transitioning between sectors. The concept of ‘seeing is believing’ is extremely powerful, with studies showing that students are more likely to choose particular careers when they’re exposed to situations and scenarios where they can imagine themselves in their shoes. If you would like to read the stories of our role models, specifically working in the Aerospace industry, check out our favourites below: Thales’ project with Oman Air is drawing to a successful close thanks to skilled senior systems project engineer, Estel Dandridge. Read about how Estel has led a global team developing a new signature GUI, branded ‘OMAN Aria’. We interviewed software engineer at Thales, Ivy Man about her work with the Emirates Project Design Authority who are spearheading the Engineering team working on the Boeing 777X aircraft. Read more about the inspiring project here. Morson is the No.1 aerospace recruiter, supplying the aerospace and defence industry for 50 years. Ready to find your next role? Search our Aerospace & Defence jobs here.

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    #NPWAwards Nominations with Rebekah Lee, Head of Marketing - What makes an inclusive workplace? And why we need to go beyond gender diversity

    Working as Head of Marketing for a global staffing business that operates within some of the sectors hardest hit by diversity imbalance, it has been a priority of mine from day one to embrace and promote diversity, both within the Morson Group and amongst the many stakeholders we support. I was completely honoured to be named on Northern Power Women’s Future List 2019, having been recognised by the judges for my role in challenging workplace and industry norms with regards to mental health, accessibility and diversity balance. I’m immensely proud with the progress that we’ve made, particularly in industries such as construction, nuclear, tech, aerospace and engineering, which are crying out for greater diversity. Through targeted campaigns that use role models to empower women and young girls and alter perceptions, we have successfully broken stereotypes within traditionally-male roles and workplaces. Since launching the Diversity Hub and Inclusive Role Models Portal, on morson.com we have increased female applications by 69% compared to last year. In addition, our ‘Morson Equals Opportunities’ campaign has ensured that every candidate gets an equal chance to develop their career by being able to access the same opportunities to gain and maintain employment. By adding accessibility software to our website, which provides adaptations for visitors with dyslexia, visual impairment and learning difficulties, we have made our online recruitment process accessible to everyone. 27% more of the UK population can now access our online content, apply for roles and seek recruitment support than could previously. This year, Northern Power Women adopted the #WeCan theme, inviting women to come forward as role models to celebrate their achievements and share their commitment to gender diversity. As a female leader in a male-dominated industry, I’m proud to be a role model. Yet for me, the issue of diversity and inclusion goes far beyond gender and being named as a Northern Power Women future leader provides me with a platform to demonstrate how, in order to establish a truly inclusive workplace, we need to break down barriers across gender, mental health, sexuality, accessibility and more. By taking a unified approach, I hope to drive even more positive change across our business and key stakeholder groups. Morson has already made a strong commitment to becoming a more accessible employer, living by its core values. We’ve committed to the Inclusive Culture Pledge, meaning we will receive dedicated support to help us improve diversity in our workplace, as well as partnering with Stonewall, Europe’s largest lesbian, gay, bi and trans (LGBT) charity, as part of their Diversity Champions Programme. It is also important that we raise awareness around mental health and alter attitudes within the workplace, by opening up the conversation and creating a culture where employees feel safe to talk. This is exactly what Morson are working to achieve through our mental health first aiders programme, mental health whitepaper, staff training and more. Using our connections in the sporting world we have championed autism and reduced the stigma around mental illness. Partnerships with, premiership rugby team, Sale Sharks, and the boxing community have activated awareness and challenged perceptions of these topics, particularly with regards to traditional notions of masculinity. I feel strongly that workplace inclusivity should be on the agenda for every employer and I’m encouraging all businesses to take inspiration from the Morson Group and implement at least one positive programme of change this year. Not only is it the right thing to do to ensure that no one is excluded from reaching their full potential, but it’s good for business with numerous proven commercial benefits. By adopting a fully inclusive approach as an employer, you are widening your reach and creating a richer and more diverse talent pool. Originally posted on the Northern Power Women website https://www.northernpowerwomen.com/npwawards-nominations-with-rebekah-lee/ #NPWAWARDS nominations are now open! You can nominate individuals and organisations (including yourself) from all sectors, genders and regions across the north. Take time shine a light on others – everyone is a role model to someone! Find out more and nominate here.

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    From mum to management, postnatal depression and inspiring women into rail – Charlotte Curtis from First Group talks about her career

    DIVERSITY & INCLUSION | 4 MIN READ We sat down with Charlotte Curtis, Project Manager at First Group to find out more about her career journey and aspirations for the future. Find out more about Morosn's commitment to diversity. Due to expansion and significant investment in infrastructure, confidence in the UK rail industry is at its highest. Crossrail and the soon to commence HS2 projects are just two of the landmark schemes that are helping the sector to flourish. Consequently, the rail market has the opportunity to be a catalyst for change, as the success of these technical projects depends on reaching into a diverse pool of talent to deliver them. With initiatives such as the (Morson sponsored) Big Rail Diversity Challenge, the rail sector is actively embracing the opportunity to improve gender diversity within the industry and, most importantly, inspiring the next generation of diverse talent. One of the companies at the forefront of rail transformation in the UK is First Group who are a leading provider of transport services in the UK and North America. First Group is one of the UK’s most experienced rail operators, carrying more than 260m passengers across their three franchises and their open-access operation a year. We sat down with Charlotte Curtis, Project Manager at First Group to find out more about her career journey and aspirations for the future… “Currently I work in a project management role delivering the design and build of Feltham Depot. It’s a large project, consisting of 10 sidings, a staff accommodation block, connection to the mainline and enabling works. The purpose of the scheme is to stable the new 701 fleet trains.” Charlotte explains that there is no typical day at work, one of the best things about her role is that it’s varied and always challenging: “My days differ dependent on the lifecycle stage of the project for example during Grip 3 (option selection) I found myself attending frequent IDR (Initial Design Review) sessions with our appointed designer. During the same period, I supported our designer with preparing all of the environmental studies that are required to submit to the Council as we needed planning approval from the from Hounslow in order to commence with the development.” Young women are enormously underrepresented in rail and engineering, and yet stand to make a massive contribution. Charlotte discusses some of the challenges she has encountered working in a male-dominated environment: “I'd like to think I bring diversity to our current team being a full-time working mum of two in her late 30s. I came on board to this project with a fresh pair of eyes and I was able to bring not only my experience within the rail sector but a positive attitude and exceptional organisational skills having juggled two children under the age of two years old.” The use of our railway lines is expected to double in the next 25 years and so to meet this challenge we need a diverse workforce with innovative ideas at the forefront of rail operations. Charlotte chats about her aspirations for the next 5-10 years… “Firstly, being a mum of two girls, I'd like them to witness that women have the power to accomplish anything especially when it comes to their careers. I would also like to increase the value of the type of contracts I'm managing. I'm currently owning and monitoring various workstreams, but I would like to learn new things and develop my contract awareness through training courses.” Charlotte chats about how she juggles being a busy mum of two and working full time: “I’d like to think I maintain a good work-life balance and I think it’s all about using your time wisely. I have a 1.5-hour commute to work every day, I tend to use my journey time to respond to emails whilst I'm on the train. I push myself to go to the gym every lunchtime Monday – Friday, I think this breaks up my day and releases tension. I threw myself into my role at First Group and have encountered many occasions where I’ve ended up spending my nights working on my laptop after my children have gone to bed. Very different from being a full time stay at home mum! I thrive on the fact that I have a good job and great people to work with who show me respect and offer support. I can't imagine not working as it gives me a sense of purpose, so my advice to all those mums who want to get back into work, just do it!” After taking three years off work to have her children, Charlotte was unfortunately affected by post-natal depression and struggled to get back into the industry she loved. She discusses how she got back into work with the help of Morson… “Taking three years off work to have my two children seemed like a lifetime and despite doing admin tasks for my husband’s company during this period, I still felt like I’d lost my identity. I can remember some companies turning me down for an interview because I’d spent more than 12-months working within in a non-rail environment. I felt like I was being punished for wanting to raise a family, but I was determined to get my career back on track and all I needed was one person to believe in me. One day I got a call from a Staci Hodson-Glenn at Morson (also a driven hard-working mum) who was about to give me the break I deserved. She put me forward for a role with one of her clients, First Group and I haven’t looked back since.” Charlotte has now embarked on a new challenge as Project Manager for South Western Railway. She will be working on a 2-year project worth 5.3 million, delivering CCIF (customer and community improvement funded projects). We wish her all the success and look forward to catching up with her about her new role soon! Morson’s dedication to diversity As an organisation which operates in sectors hardest hit by imbalances, Morson is dedicated to improving diversity within the industries we work; in 2017 our CEO, Ged Mason OBE, pledged to double the number of female engineer contractors we have working for us by 2020, a figure which we’re well on the way to achieving. In March, we announced our first official diversity ambassador, CEO and founder of Northern Power Women, Simone Roche MBE, to help us on our journey to creating truly inclusive workforces. Simone joins a growing list of existing Morson ambassadors across business, sport and the armed forces. Find out more about our partnership with Simone here. For more information on Morson's commitment to diversity check out our Diversity Portal. Or to find your next opportunity search jobs here.

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    Morson takes Pride in its people with latest track campaign

    DIVERSITY & INCLUSION | 6 MIN READ Hundreds of Morson Track Operatives working on the London Underground are being given rainbow-striped laces for their safety boots in celebration and support of the LGBT community. As members of LGBT charity Stonewall’s Diversity Champions programme, Morson has committed to ensuring all of its candidates are encouraged to be themselves at work, driving performance, engagement and innovation. Read more about the Rainbow Laces campaign and Morson's ongoing commitment to diversity & inclusion. Hundreds of Morson Track Operatives working on the London Underground are being given rainbow-striped laces for their safety boots in celebration and support of the LGBT community. Manchester-headquartered Morson International, which supplies contingent and skilled labour across the UK rail infrastructure, is presenting each of its Track Operatives with the unmissable eye-catching laces. In addition to them forming part of the Operatives’ uniform, all contractors are being thoroughly briefed on the meaning behind the laces, whilst also receiving new training in fairness, inclusion and respect to encourage discussions and promote openness and acceptance. The introduction of the new laces follows the huge Pride celebrations that took place in the capital. Significantly, the initiative has been devised to run permanently, shining a spotlight on commitments by Morson and London Underground to continuously support the LGBT community. The laces are just one element of a wider commitment to equality, diversity and inclusion by Morson. As members of LGBT charity Stonewall’s Diversity Champions programme, Morson has committed to ensuring all of its candidates are encouraged to be themselves at work, driving performance, engagement and innovation.Through its involvement with Stonewall, Morson aims to collaborate, learn and share cutting-edge best practice and initiatives with its partners, equipping them with the skills to recruit diverse talent. “We do a lot of work behind the scenes to support LGBT communities and this campaign is about making that commitment visible,” says Gareth Morris, group director of health, safety, quality and environmental at Morson. “We’re looking to build a network of true allies, helping people to feel safe and welcome when they use the London Underground or join its workforce. It’s something that many of us take for granted, but we cannot underestimate the importance of visibly defining public spaces, such as the Tube as inclusive, safe places for everyone. “It was important to us that this wasn’t just a flash-in-the-pan campaign, meaning our Operatives will be proudly wearing the rainbow stripe permanently, just as our commitment to LGBT support is constant and lasting,” he added. As this campaign seeks to demonstrate support for LGBT workers in the industry, a number of initiatives are underway across the rail sector to promote diversity. TfL’s striking Pride campaign saw station signs transformed with the colours of three pride flags, representing Gay Pride, Bisexual Pride and Trans Pride. Not only did it embrace the More Colour More Pride movement in incorporating black and brown stripes into the rainbow flag to represent the BAME LGBT community, but 2019 marked the first use of the Bi Pride flag, with is pink and purple colourway. Catch up on the latest Diversity & Inclusion news from Morson From mum to management, postnatal depression and inspiring women into rail – Charlotte Curtis from First Group talks about her career #NPWAwards Nominations with Rebekah Lee, Head of Marketing - What makes an inclusive workplace? And why we need to go beyond gender diversity Morson and J Murphy & Sons Proudly Sponsor Women in Rail #TransformTheFuture Event Network Rail’s Archway network for LGBT employees also gives staff the opportunity to influence policy-making across the business and allows members to meet colleagues in more sociable settings through talks and events up and down the country. Sam Price, head of client engagement at Morson, added: “Working for equality, diversity and inclusion has real impact, not just on the lives of individuals from all walks of life, but in creating diverse cultures and broader empathy in workplaces across the country. We understand the complexities of widening participation in UK industry, and take our commitment to this very seriously." “The rail industry as a whole is working hard to improve diversity of all kinds, including its gender split and proportion of disabled, BAME and LGBT employees,” added Sam. “By collaborating with a number of organisations and taking inspiration from others, including those outside of our industry, it’s our goal to become a leader in diversity and inclusion for the rail industry.” Kate Williams, head of private memberships at Stonewall, concluded: “Wearing rainbow laces is a really positive way for Morson’s workers to show their support for lesbian, gay, bi and trans communities. Through our Diversity Champions programme, we’re working with Morson to help them build a truly inclusive workplace culture.” Find out more about our Rainbow Laces campaign and read about our wider diversity and inclusion initiative here.

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    Flying the flag for women in rail

    DIVERSITY | 4 MIN READ We chat to Anna Wooden who is flying the flag for women in rail working within Morson's rail division. Find out more about her flourishing career and how she says that working within a male-dominated industry only makes her even more determined to prove that women are equal to men when out on track. We’ve proudly been flying the flag for women in rail for numerous years as we deploy a number of initiatives and programmes to create equality within the industry, not just in terms of gender, but across all under-represented groups to establish true diversity and inclusivity. Anna Wooden is one of a number of hugely talented females working within our rail divisions. Her journey began on a 16-week training programme, with Anna’s keen eye for detail, work ethic and intuitive nature seeing her stand out. Working in an industry that’s male-dominated doesn’t faze Anna, and as the only female within her gang, she says this only makes her even more determined to prove that women are equal to men when out on track... “When I started out, I was especially determined to prove my capability. I was the only female in my training group and I wondered how many females actually worked on the railway, but I knew I was as good as anyone. I proved that I could do the job from day one and now no-one second guesses me." “I had never expected to work on the track – or even in this industry. It is tough and there’s no denying that the job is hard, but if you keep pushing at it, it will become easier. There is still some change to be done in rail but I do see the industry is on the cusp of transformation." “I would encourage more women to consider working in jobs like mine – I enjoy it and work good hours. Sometimes fear holds people back, both men and women. I really do think that some people within the industry, outside of Morson, still have a fear that a woman could come on track and do a better job than them.” Turning her hand to anything that comes her way, Anna was recently awarded a ‘Made a Difference’ accolade after successfully presenting to our biggest clients’ 150-strong track delivery unit. Anna’s line manager and operations manager, Chris Humphreys, added: “Anna’s ambition will lead her to one day becoming a Supervisor, something that will be a real milestone in both of our careers, as I’m yet in my 15 years in the industry to meet a female that leads track maintenance and track renewal gangs." “She’s a shining light in our industry and is breaking down barriers and changing the dynamics of females on track to hopefully inspire and encourage more women to seek a career in rail, because, without stars like Anna, the industry really is missing out. She’s well respected among her peers and I’m keen to see what bright future Anna will carve out within the sector.” For more information on Morson's commitment to diversity check out our Diversity Portal. Or to find your next opportunity search Morson jobs here.

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    Morson Sponsor R-Ladies Manchester event at Thoughtworks

    DIVERSITY EVENT | 2 MIN READ Morson was proud to sponsor the R-Ladies data event which was focused around creating diversity in data hosted by Thoughtworks. The mission of R-Ladies is to achieve proportionate representation by encouraging, inspiring, and empowering people of genders currently underrepresented in the R community. We spoke to Ellen from R-Ladies to find out more about the event. Morson was proud to sponsor the R-Ladies data event which was focused around creating diversity in data hosted by Thoughtworks. The event took place at the Thoughtworks offices, who are based in the Federation building in Manchester. Who is R-Ladies Manchester? R-Ladies Manchester was founded in 2016 and our mission is to promote gender diversity in the R community. The R community suffers from an underrepresentation of minority genders in every role and area of participation, whether as leaders, package developers, conference speakers, conference participants, educators, or users. TOP BLOG | From mum to management, postnatal depression and inspiring women into rail – Charlotte Curtis from First Group talks about her career As a diversity initiative, the mission of R-Ladies is to achieve proportionate representation by encouraging, inspiring, and empowering people of genders currently underrepresented in the R community. R-Ladies’ primary focus, therefore, is on supporting minority gender R enthusiasts to achieve their programming potential, by building a collaborative global network of R leaders, mentors, learners, and developers to facilitate individual and collective progress worldwide. Ellen from R-Ladies discusses the event in more detail… “The speaker for the evening was the brilliant Phrances Perez, who works at BookingGo as a Data Analyst. Phrances spoke about her important learnings in R and followed on from their previous event in August by building on our Shiny know-how, even more, talking about reactive functions. She also covered the important topic of version control and also some best practices - which I think we can all learn from! To keep the momentum going, we went straight into the second talk, the Hacktoberfest event. We at R-Ladies have teamed up with a tonne of other great groups from Manchester to host an all-day Hackathon event as part of the Hacktoberfest series of global events! It’s shaping up to be a really exciting day, with food, drink, live podcasting and of course, loads of coding! There was plenty of food and drink leftover to be eaten up, so we stopped to refill our plates before moving on to the discussion. Phrances’ talk sparked tonnes of interesting questions and we managed to stay on topic for the rest of the evening! We covered Stack Overflow, open-source software in big commercial organisations and how academia should change to incorporate interactivity into publications; all hot topics that got everyone joining in!” The event was a huge success and one that Morson was proud to be a part of. Stay tuned for more exciting collaborations with R-Ladies in the new year! For more information on Morson's commitment to diversity check out our Diversity Portal. Or to find your next opportunity search Morson jobs here.

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