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Diversity and Inclusion

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For more videos exploring the careers of our inspiring female clients and co-workers visit our dedicated Women in Industry YouTube channel. Or join the conversion on LinkedIn.  Our group is a place to share knowledge, inspire change and shout about success, no matter what industry or sector you work in.

Welcome to the Morson diversity portal where you can find insights on attracting all generations recruitment, tips to be more successful and guides to inclusive leadership. We are committed to changing perceptions within business, championing women in engineering and empowering young talent through mentorship.

Adrian Adair, Operations Director at Morson, articluates why we're diversity and inclusion is core to Morson:

“There’s no denying that diversity achieves better commercial results by driving innovative ideas, changing the status quo and raising the bar for success. Yet it isn’t just as easy as attracting talent from underrepresented groups, as a business must also create working environments that champion equality and inclusivity from the inside out.

“We strive to ensure that our workforce represents our customers and society as a whole, which means recruiting from the widest talent pool and giving our people the tools, drivers and learning opportunities to reach their full potential, from entry to board level.

“We’re the only recruiter to commit to a target for increasing the number of female contractors that we employ and are using our own business as a sounding board to perfect our diversity initiatives and challenge stereotypes, so these can be rolled out to our clients to develop cultures that embrace change and ultimately outperform their peers.”

Diversity Champions

We are proud to be members of Stonewalls Diversity Champions programme. Stonewall are Europe's largest lesbian, gay, bi and trans (LGBT) charity. Diversity Champions is the leading employers' programme for ensuring all LGBT staff are accepted without exception in the workplace.

Morson aim to create a workplace where LGBT staff can be themselves, driving performance, engagement and innovation.  Through our involvement with Stonewall we aim to collaborate, learn and share cutting edge best practice and initiatives to enhance our ability to recruit diverse talent.

Inclusive Culture Pledge

Here at Morson we are committed to improving the diversity of our company and building inclusive cultures every day. Not only is this good for business, it’s also the right thing to do. We aim to be a truly 21st century workforce, where everyone’s talents are welcomed, valued and nurtured.

As part of this we are committing to the Inclusive Culture Pledge, a special initiative by diversity consultancy EW Group.  By signing up to EW Group’s Pledge, we will benefit from a year of dedicated support on five key aspects of diversity development: Leadership, People, Brand, Data and Future. Together this will provide a focus for building our skills, awareness, confidence and maturity around workplace diversity over the course of 2018. In doing so, we are making a commitment, internally and outwardly, to the lasting importance of diversity and inclusion to our company culture. For more information visit https://theewgroup.com

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Our diversity and inclusion blog delivers the latest thought leadership, videos and content

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    VolkerWessels UK's Hollie Woodard Talks Diversity In Engineering

    As part of our diversity in engineering series, Morson spoke to Hollie Woodard, Head of Equality, Diversity and Inclusion at VolkerWessels UK. Hollie started her career in rail administration but has changed multiple times since, moving into commercial and a quantity surveyor role and then project management. She reflects on the state of the industry and how things have developed since she started: "When I started, there were definitely less women in senior roles, so for me there weren't many role models for people who were in roles other than admin or support roles. That's starting to change. In some of our businesses we've got a female head of engineering, a female pre-contracts director. So seeing those people in those roles is something that's definitely changed over the years. We're also seeing more females come in through the apprenticeship and graduate route. For example, in our VolkerRail business we've got female apprentices who are studying the overhead line discipline." Hollie started her current role in October 2017. It wasn't a role that existed at the company initially, but she worked with the senior management team and directors within the business to devise a role that she felt was required within the business. "A typical day involves a lot of liasing with other departments like HR, the bid teams, our directors, business MD's and also learning and development. We're looking at the strategy tat we want to implement and how we might want to roll that out to each business unit." With her career being so varied, Hollie has had to draw on a lot of different skills at different times. When asked what the key skill or attribute required for her current role, she says: "Passion. If you're passionate, it helps you with the role, helps you deliver it and also explain why it's important to other people. My previous role as a project manager in the rail industry, being often the only female in meetings or on site, has helped me really want to have that passion for wanting to make the picture look quite different in the future. People skills are always useful, along with communication skills. A lot of the new role involves explaining to people and communicating to people in different ways about what the benefit might be to them and to the business and helping them understand that." Hollie sees her newly created role as one of many steps towards building a different, more diverse working culture. "We recognise as an industry we need to do things differently. We recognise that we've not got enough people coming into the industry to futureproof and deliver the projects of the future. How can we do things differently to attract people to our industry as a career of choice? There are some campaigns that we're doing with our regular recruitment partners looking at how we change our job adverts, looking at how we change the language in our job adverts for example. That might be things like using gender neutral language, making sure we're not specifying if we need certain years experience to attract more people that might be put off by that." Hollie would ideally like to see like to see her role become almost not required in terms of trying to bring more females into the industry, but still sees its inception as a new position one of her real highlights: My biggest achievement in my career would probably be having this role approved by the board! This role didn't exist this time last year and it was a real step change for us to have this position, so to be able to approach the board and be able to ask them to let me drive this forward for our business was a real achievement for me. In additon to that as a project manager and quantity surveyor, earlier on in my career I was recognised by Women in Rail as one of the 20 most inspirational women in rail, which was lovely because I was nominated by my peers. In 2017 I was also shortlisted for the Northern Power Women 'One to Watch' category.

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    Making Diversity Synonymous With Success

    Soon to mark 50 years in business, much of Morson International’s journey from a bedroom-born recruiter established in 1969 to a global leader in technical sectors, rests on our ability to remain agile and adapt to the evolving needs of our clients, contractors, candidates and employees. Equality, diversity and inclusion (ED&I) remain hot topics, especially when analysing representation, or the often thereby lack of, at the top, and we’re working hard to ensure that ED&I becomes part of the norm by changing the conversation. A lack of diversity has created an imbalance in many of the sectors that we operate in, such as engineering, aerospace, IT, rail, nuclear and construction, and we’ve witnessed first-hand how females, LGBTQ+ and ethnic minorities have been underrepresented, particularly at senior level. Change is Coming Within our own business, we strive to ensure that our workforce represents our customers and society as a whole, which means recruiting from the widest talent pool possible and giving our people the tools, drivers and learning opportunities to thrive and reach their full potential, from entry through to board level. We are ferociously challenging stereotypes to build diverse workforces that drive innovative ideas, change the status quo and raise the bar for success. Including inclusivity as one of our core company values ensures that we do everything possible to provide a fair, open and equal culture from the top down and bottom up so that ED&I touches every part of what we do. We also excel in the levels of diversity amongst our senior management and to ensure our board of the future replicates this same forward-thinking approach to talent irrespective of their gender, race, sexuality, age, religion and belief, and more, we run an ongoing mentoring programme with our leaders who possess the drive to reach the top. Diversity breeds innovation, productivity and drives commercial earnings, and we work in partnership with a number of our clients to champion their own ED&I programmes, by giving everyone a voice and developing cultures that embrace change and outperform their peers. The Diversity and Leadership Exchange Maintaining an equal, diverse and inclusive workforce is part of Morson International’s DNA. As one of the most respected names in recruitment, we’ve built a business that delivers excellence for our employees, candidates, contractors and clients. Improving diversity, particularly in leadership positions, is good for business, yet many technical sectors still lack gender and ethnic diversity at senior level. We’re hosting a unique panel event which brings together world-class leaders from various professions and industries to share their own stories and insights on leadership behaviours to create inclusive cultures, lead successfully diverse teams and develop environments where all staff can thrive and reach their full potential. Our panel includes: Anna Delveccio, FTA Everywomen Transport and Logistics Woman of the Year 2018. A champion for women in transport who began her illustrious engineering career aged just 15 and by her early 30s, was already appointed commercial account director for infrastructure giant, Amey Alex Rodick, client account manager at Stonewall, Europe’s largest LGBT charity. Alex's focus is on supporting the professional services industry to increase LGBT diversity in the workplace and ensure that individuals can reach their full potential. Simone Roche (MBE), CEO & Founder of Northern Power Women, Simone launched Northern Power Women out of a passion to connect and engage with people about gender equality. Adrian Adair, operations director, Morson International, Adrian is a major driving force behind Morson International’s diversification into new markets and transforming the brand into a global specialist in permanent and interim talent-based solutions. To achieve this, he has identified the future boardroom, ensuring it’s diverse, equal and inclusive. ​ We will be releasing the findings of the event in a video and write up which hopes to uncover the latest trends affecting business and how current and future leaders can navigate these issues to create more diverse teams that are engaged, productive and innovative, and ultimately drive business objectives. Show Your Support Tweet us using the hashtag #DiversityinLeadership and tag in @MorsonGroup

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    Almost Half of Employees With Mental Health Issues Hide It From Colleagues

    We recently surveyed our contractor workforce and found that almost half (46%) of employees living with a mental health condition do not inform their employer, with more than a third (39%) saying that they feared their reaction and the repercussions. Other reasons cited included not being comfortable telling the individual (59%), the stigma around mental health (42%) and the lack of support in the workplace (22%); with 55% saying they were either unaware of any support available or that their workplace lacked in any assistance for mental illness. The same survey of 1,400 respondents, which comprised 80% males aged 41+ working within sectors such as construction, professional services, IT, digital, engineering and rail, revealed that 1 in 5 (21%) had experienced a mental health problem and of those, 62% were either seeking treatment or had sought treatment in the past. Almost 1 in 10 (9%) of all respondents had also at some point considered taking their own life, revealing that their mental health issue had left them feeling suicidal. Adrian Adair, operations director at Morson International, said: “These results are shocking and unacceptable. There’s still a major disconnect between mental health awareness and openness at work, which means people are still uncomfortable discussing the subject due to fear of what their employer may think or the risk of them losing their job altogether. “Too many people are suffering in silence, which can often result in people having time off work. Four of the respondents said they were off work for more than a year as a result of their mental illness, which will have had a significant impact on their employer in lost productivity. “Safety is paramount in many of the sectors that these respondents operate in and whilst their employers take great strides in protecting their people from physical harm, the same effort is needed to address mental ill health. We need to stamp out the taboos by developing open and honest cultures that are supplemented with better support and training to help sport the early signs of mental ill health. Male dominated sectors are less comfortable discussing mental health, which is why it is crucial that we create environments where anyone can voice their concerns without fear.” We have taken practical steps to tackle these issues, training a handful of staff across the business in becoming ‘mental health first aiders’, who now possess the practical skills to spot the signs of mental illness within our workforce, including our contractors and the confidence to intervene and support those in need. Our objective is to bolster our mental health first aiders over the coming months to have multiple trained operatives located across each of its key regions. Adrian adds: “We’ve prioritised mental ill health within our own business and developed meaningful and impactful mental, emotional and physical wellbeing programmes to support our staff and help them to thrive; and we hope other employers take inspiration from what we’ve done to spark their own initiatives.” To mark World Mental Health Day, we have released a new whitepaper highlighting workplace mental health and the steps employers can take to create a happier, healthier and more productive workforce. The whitepaper includes more insights from our contractor survey supported by powerful personal stories of our own employee's and ex-Morson sponsored boxer Ricky Hatton. To download, visit www.morson.com/tackling-mental-health

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    Do Men Feel Included or Excluded in the Push to Increase Diversity? | Masculinity in Engineering Survey

    EqualEngineers is launching its first survey investigating masculinity in engineering, a first-of-its-kind for the sector. The survey will be open for 5 weeks, closing on 16th November 2018. Engineering and technology in the UK is a predominately male profession, with men comprising over 89% of the workforce. Many diversity efforts pivot on getting more women into engineering. This survey will explore if the culture of engineering is affected by the stereotype of what an engineer looks like, and how men are expected to behave. Do men feel included or excluded in the push to increase diversity? Could a more diverse profession benefit both women and men? Suicide is the biggest killer of men under 50, with male construction workers 3.7 times more likely to take their own life. Are men able to be open about their mental health challenges, or is the stigmatisation too great? Does this manifest itself as a macho culture in the workplace or on-site which prevents an inclusive culture? This survey would like to know your views and opinions - the real ones, not the ones that you feel that you should express. We expect respondents to give us their real answers, not just the "right" answers. The survey is the brainchild of Dr Mark McBride-Wright, Managing Director of EqualEngineers, who set the company up after years of working in the sector and seeing not only the challenges that the lack of diversity can bring, but also the risks posed to health, safety and wellbeing. Being a gay safety engineer himself, and setting up networking group InterEngineering for LGBT+ engineers gave him the drive to set up an organisation covering all aspects of diversity. Mark says: “For me, inclusivity in the workplace is a health and safety issue. Not being able to be open about who you are, because of attitudes and lack of diversity around you can lead to mental health issues and decreased wellbeing. In Construction, for example, an industry where suicide rates among men are more than three times the national average, more needs to be done to ensure that commitment to these issues goes much further than token inclusion policies. My hopes for this survey is to capture the voice of men in the engineering and tech industries, individuals who perhaps feel excluded from the focus on diversity and inclusion efforts of organisations. We need to rapidly overhaul the way in which we approach culture change programmes within our industry, and we need to ensure everyone feels included, and is able to find their voice as part of the diversity narrative.” Ian Childs, Executive Manager, Morson International says: “As the UK’s No.1 Technical Recruiter, Morson engages with a huge engineering community. Our business has taken great strides to improve the diversity of our contractor population, doubling the number of female engineers we employ. Now it’s time to look deeper and assess how these cultural changes affect the workforce as a whole. The stigma around mental health keeps too many people silent. Safety is paramount in many of the sectors that we operate in and whilst employers take great strides in protecting their people from physical harm, the same effort is now needed to address mental ill health. We are pleased to be supporting EqualEngineers in this study.” Initial results from the EqualEngineers Masculinity in Engineering Survey will be reported on International Men’s Day on 19th November. For more information, visit http://bit.ly/EEMasculinitySurvey. To take survey directly, visit https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/EqEngMasculinitySurvey.

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    Attracting and Retaining the Best Talent with a Strong Employer Brand

    At Morson we firmly believe that the biggest driver of a business' success is its people. Therefore, attracting and retaining the best talent should be a top priority for every business. Competition in the recruitment industry is fierce and taking advantage of your employer brand is a key way to differentiate yourself in a crowded marketplace. A strong employer brand allows you to portray a sense of who you are as an employer, what makes you the best company to work for, what it's like to work for your company and how you value your employees. By consistently and creatively showcasing what makes your business great, you will reduce the time to hire, reduce recruitment costs and hire relevant and high-quality candidates. "TODAY OVER 59% OF EMPLOYERS SAY THAT EMPLOYER BRANDING REPRESENTS ONE OF THE KEY COMPONENTS OF THE ORGANISATION'S OVERALL HR STRATEGY" With a growing skills-for-job culture and a shift to replace the outdated job-for-life model, the job market is becoming much more agile and flexible, and candidates expectations of a company are moving in parallel. In addition, with unemployment rates at a record low in the UK, Europe and the US, its never been easier to secure a job and the most talented individuals have serious power in choosing their next career move. In having that choice, candidates have the opportunity to question why they should choose to apply for or continue to work for your company. Starting from inside your organisation Setting out your employer value proposition (EVP) and bringing it to life starts from inside your organisation. Outline what an employee receives from your company in exchange for their talents. The benefits we are talking about here aren’t things like medical insurance or holidays. "EVERYONE CONNECTED WITH THE GROUP FEELS PART OF THE 'MORSON FAMILY', IT'S THIS CULTURE OF INCLUSIVITY THAT SITS AT THE HEART OF ALL OF OUR EMPLOYER BRANDING. MORSON HAS A PROGRAMME OF STRUCTURED TRAINING, COACHING AND MENTORING, RAISING THE EMPLOYABILITY OF OUR WORKFORCE BY BUILDING SKILLS AND COMPETENCIES IN BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT AND PROMOTING PERSONAL GROWTH. CONTINUING TO INVEST TIME, MONEY AND RESOURCE MAXIMISES INDIVIDUALS' ABILITIES, LAYS THE FOUNDATION FOR HIGHLY SUCCESSFUL CAREERS AND CREATES A COMBINED DESIRE FOR EXCELLENCE ACROSS THE GROUP AND ITS WIDER NETWORK" - BECKI ROSS, HEAD OF HR AT MORSON GROUP Refine benefit structures such as career development, community involvement, leadership etc. and deliver this brand experience in your employee’s day to day life through training, development and reward programmes. These attributes can play a huge part in differentiating you from your competitors and attracting top talent. Want to know more about how you can increase retention and attract top talent for your business? We've created an #EmployerBranding Guide to help you do just that. Get your copy here.

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    "75% of Job Seekers Consider an Employer's Brand Before Applying for a Job" | Our 10 Step Checklist for Creating a Strong Employer Brand

    An employer brand showcases an organisation as an employer. Creating an employer brand and promoting your company as an employer of choice positions you to attract, recruit and retain your ideal employee’s. Creating an employer brand is about showing candidates what your company can offer. Practically, it can be a powerful business tool to create a more productive workforce and position your organisation for long-term success. Employer branding is no longer an option for businesses, it’s a must. Digitalisation now means that candidates can easily get an impression of your business through a wide variety of networks and platforms. Your employer brand is a window into your business and should clearly embody your organisation's values and culture in order to attract top talent. Regardless of the sector that you operate in or the size of your company, creating an engaging employer brand will significantly help when it comes to hiring new staff and retaining your best talent. "75% OF JOB SEEKERS CONSIDER AN EMPLOYER’S BRAND BEFORE THEY EVEN APPLY TO AN OPPORTUNITY WITH THE COMPANY." We've put together a 10 step checklist for creating a strong employer brand: 1. Use social media to promote your brand. 2. Listen to employee feedback and implement change. 3. Ensure branding and anything customer facing is consistent and aligned with your brand values. 4. Engage with your customers regularly, whether that be via email, blogs, announcements or traditional methods. 5. Reply to your customer's queries, remember the customer is always right. 6. Don't dismiss review sites like Glassdoor, potential candidates look at them and form opinions. 7. Invest in leadership development within your organisation to ensure consistency from the top. 8. Embrace diversity and inclusivity to create an inclusive culture where each employee feels that they are valued and can contribute is key to business success. 9. Value your employees. 10. Keep up to date with current industry trends to stay ahead of the competition. Want to know more about how you can increase retention and attract top talent for your business? We've created an #EmployerBranding Guide to help you do just that. Get your copy here.

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    Morson Partner with EngineeringUK to Deliver Inspiring Social Mobility Event

    Morson was proud to partner with Engineering UK and the University of Salford at the latest Engineering Connections ‘Spotlight on Social Mobility’ event this week. The event sought to explore why individuals from disadvantaged backgrounds are underrepresented in engineering occupations, making up just 24% of the workforce. EngineeringUK’s first event out of London was a huge success, featuring talks from leading experts in the field of social mobility (including Morson’s own Andy Robinson and Gerry Mason Scholar Muhtaba Ghulam) and interesting debate which could have carried on well into the afternoon. Hosted by Mark Tittering, CEO of EngineeringUK, the speakers included: Dr Lindsay Richards, Centre for Social Investigation at Nuffield College Andy Robinson, Training Support Manager at Morson Vital Training Phil East, CEO Salford Foundation Mujtaba Ghulam, Engineering Student at the University of Salford Andy from Morson Vital Training passionately spoke of the work that he himself and Morson as a wider group undertake to support social mobility. As the lead for the level 2 rail engineering apprenticeship programme, Andy plays an instrumental role in the development and continuous improvement of young people through apprenticeships. With a background in education, he also outlined his work in schools as an Enterprise Advisor with GMCA, where he works closely with the schools to improve their careers provision. Stressing the importance of engaging with children who may have limited aspirations due to the communities they live in, Andy outlined that it is within schools where most impact can be made. By making them aware of the opportunities available and providing them with routes to employment and role models to look up to, Andy aims to build the next generation of engaged and motivated professionals. In one such activity, Morson Vital Training hosted the Girls Network, for a #careersontrack event where students from St Ambrose School visited their rail training facility in Salford. The year 10 and 12 pupils from St Ambrose spent an afternoon gaining practical experience of rail safety and skills and exploring opportunities in engineering. Positively, many of the girls came away from the event considering apprenticeships in the engineering world. For many, the event ‘opened their eyes’ to engineering and for one pupil the event has spurred her on to realising her dream to become a construction engineer and encourage more women into the profession. Read more about this initiative here. Andy also discussed our target to double the number of female contractors by 2020 and being part of the 5% club charter where we strive to get 5% of our workforce in ‘earn and learn’ positions within five years of joining. He also spoke about the work that Morson do to support the Armed Forces, having recruited 1,220 ex-forces personnel in the last 12 months. We heard from Mujtaba, an engineering student at the University of Salford who explained how the Gerry Mason Scholarship, part of a pledge of £270,000 which enables talented young people who would otherwise be deterred from university because of costs, to pursue an engineering degree, has given him the opportunity to achieve his dream of becoming a Chartered Engineer. Reflecting on the event, Andy said: “It was a pleasure to attend and be a speaker at the EngineeringUK event on Social Mobility. The wide spectrum of organisations represented demonstrate there is a real appetite in industry at the moment to make the difference and help people from all walks of life reach their potential, whilst securing engineering infrastructure projects for years to come.” If you would like to learn more about Morson’s Apprenticeship programme, click here. Or, to read more about our charity involvement, click here.

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    Could Robots be the Key to Eliminating Unconscious Bias in Recruitment?

    Recent studies reveal that there is still a considerable way to go to eliminating gender bias from the recruitment process, especially in the engineering sector. According to the latest figures from the Women’s Engineering Society (WES), only 11% of the UK’s engineering workforce is female. Both women and men who study Engineering and Technology express similar levels of intent to work in the industry, however, 66.2% of men and only 47.4% of women went on to work in engineering and technology in 2011. Launched earlier this month, a robot called Furhat has set out on a mission to try and combat this issue. Advanced technology enables him to communicate with humans by listening, speaking, showing emotions and participating in conversations. The market-ready robot has been designed to create an intuitive, human-like and engage experience making the way that people interact with technology much more natural. (Image sourced via furhatrobotics.com) In an interview for Recruiter Magazine, Samer Al Moubayed, CEO of furhatrobotics.com said: "We know that about 70% of interviews for jobs are biased, bias comes from the state of mind of the recruiter when they enter the interview. So potentially the appearance, the age and the background, dialect, accent of the job candidate – things that we know shouldn’t be taken into account in an interview process but with humans are naturally biased. We’re trying to explore this exact question of how a robot can contribute to this area." It is believed that the technology firm is exploring the use of Furhat to complete competency-based interviews in the initial stages of the recruitment process. He will be able to ask the questions and then collect all the data to be able to pass on to a specialist recruiter to review, therefore removing the unconscious bias at the beginning of the recruitment process. Samer added: “The goals of the project are really global, the first language this system is going to cover is Swedish but we’re going to roll out English quite early in the process. The goal is to see if this can be turned into a product for staffing companies in Sweden and globally.” Watch the video below to find out more about Furhat. (Video sourced via furhatrobotics.com) Ready to progress your career? Click here to search Morson jobs

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    How to Eliminate Gender Bias from the Recruitment Process

    Recent studies reveal that there is still a considerable way to go to eliminating gender bias from the recruitment process, especially in the engineering sector. According to the latest figures from the Women’s Engineering Society (WES), only 11% of the UK’s engineering workforce is female. Both women and men who study Engineering and Technology express similar levels of intent to work in the industry, however, 66.2% of men and 47.4% of women went on to work in engineering and technology in 2011. With new initiatives in place to encourage more women into STEM professions, what can be done to reduce unconscious bias? Set specific diversity goals Setting some realistic gender diversity targets is a good place to start and can ensure you stay on the right track throughout the entire recruitment process. By no means should you employ an individual to simply tick a box, but having goals to work towards can help to identify any problem areas that you may need to improve. Write gender-neutral job descriptions Certain phrases that are written in job adverts can deter high-quality candidates from applying for the position. For example, it is believed that on average men apply for a job when they meet 60% of the required skills whereas women only apply when they believe that they meet 100% of the required skills. A study conducted by totaljobs found an astonishing 478,175 female and male-biased words used throughout the job ads, or on average, that is six gender-coded words per advert. Male-biased words include lead, head, competitive, chief and confident whereas female-biased words include responsible, support, dependable, understanding and committed. The strategy of de-gendering the language used in job adverts to ensure they appeal to all candidates is a good way to ensure you eliminate gender bias. De-identify CVs De-identifying CVs will help to eliminate any unconscious bias in decision-making that may be susceptible to details about gender. If you evaluate each CV in exactly the same way it ensures that you are scoring the person’s CV objectively and not subjectively. However, realistically this is not always possible and so alternative steps can be taken throughout the interview process. Read on to find out more. Be aware of unconscious bias in the interview process Adding structure to an interview by having a series of standardised questions that you ask in every interview makes it easier for the interviewer to compare each candidate applying for the job. These questions can include some ice-breakers and easier questions, however, having guidelines to record and interpret responses during an interview is imperative. It’s also a good idea to identify the preferred answer to each question you are asking before you conduct the first interview. Use a diverse interview panel Depending on the type of interview process, you may be able to elect a gender diverse interview panel which can reduce the risk of unconscious gender bias. If possible, it is a good idea to extend this strategy to have a fair mix of cultural diversity and age range when conducting a series of interviews. Ensuring your recruitment process is fair and unbiased against all genders has a positive effect on the entire business. For example, a recent study conducted by UC Davis revealed that out of the 400 companies who took part, those who have a high percentage of female executives have a 74% higher return on assets and equity. Overall, companies are 15% more likely to perform better if they are gender diverse. Click here to read more about Gender Diversity in Contracting. Or for an insight into our female engineers and the roles they play for leading clients around the globe, take a look at our dedicated Women in Engineering portal.

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    Championing Equality and Inclusivity from the Inside Out, Morson’s Operations Director Features in Recruitment International Magazine

    Our Operations Director, Adrian Adair has featured in the latest issue of Recruitment International Magazine discussing the importance of diversity in business and more specifically, in recruitment. Morson prides itself on being an equal opportunities employer that provides an inclusive environment to candidates and employees alike. We believe that diversity of thought promotes innovation by bringing multiple perspectives to discussions and decisions. We are committed to improving the diversity of our company and building inclusive cultures every day. Not only is this good for business, but it’s also the right thing to do. We aim to be a truly 21st-century workforce, where everyone’s talents are welcomed, valued and nurtured. In October we hosted a unique panel event which brought together world-class leaders from various professions and industries to share their own stories and insights on leadership behaviours. They discussed ideas from creating inclusive cultures and leading successfully diverse teams to developing environments where all staff can thrive and reach their full potential. Read more about the event here. In a snippet from Recruiter International, Adrian Adair articulates why diversity and inclusion is core to Morson: “There’s no denying that diversity achieves better commercial results by driving innovative ideas, changing the status quo and raising the bar for success. Yet it isn’t just as easy as attracting talent from underrepresented groups, as a business must also create working environments that champion equality and inclusivity from the inside out.” “We strive to ensure that our workforce represents our customers and society as a whole, which means recruiting from the widest talent pool and giving our people the tools, drivers and learning opportunities to reach their full potential, from entry to board level.” “We’re the only recruiter to commit to a target for increasing the number of female contractors that we employ and are using our own business as a sounding board to perfect our diversity initiatives and challenge stereotypes, so these can be rolled out to our clients to develop cultures that embrace change and ultimately outperform their peers” To find out more about our commitment to diversity, visit our diversity hub.

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    Morson Wins 2018 Inclusive Employment Award

    Morson is delighted to be named Top Employer for our work on gender inclusivity by employment website VERCIDA. The annual awards are highly competitive and include big industry names geared towards fair and people-focused employment. Entrants are judged according to factors like diversity initiatives within their own business, the amount and type of content shared on the VERCIDA website, partnerships with diverse initiatives, external awards received that year and how they rank as candidate favourites. Morson featured in the top ten list for gender inclusivity, a list which includes HS2, Atkins and Bloomberg. VERCIDA is a careers site tuned to diversity and inclusion that only works with employers committed to values, equality, respect, culture, inclusion, diversity and accessibility. Employers use this site to showcase who they are, the jobs they have and the working environment they wish to create in order to attract a rich variety of people. The panel behind the awards are keen to explore the power of using a diversity-led careers site to reach new audiences and promote diversity and inclusion at all levels. This is part of VERCIDA’s wider intentions to help build more successful and diverse teams by supporting and facilitating a wide skill mix to employers. VERCIDA Chief Executive Officer Morgan Lobb explained, “The power of what we do is to make job search about more than just a vacancy. It’s building an environment where people bring their whole self to work, talk about success and together remove the barriers to great employment. We’re proud to be standing with our award winners who have done this so much this year in changing the way we work for the better. I congratulate them all.” Adrian Adair, Chief Operations Officer for Morson International, said “As a business, we’re practising what we preach and leading by example and it’s great to see that celebrated with this award. We’re the only recruitment agency to commit to a target for the number of female contractors that we employ. That was good for us to put a stick in the ground and have something to aim for. That’s really enabled us to focus on what we’re trying to do and we look forward to continue to be a leading light.” For more information on our diversity activity check out our dedicated Diversity Hub.

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    Morson Launch 50th Anniversary Celebrations with '50 Weeks of Giving' Campaign

    Morson launch 50th anniversary celebrations by pledging to donate to 50 different worthy causes throughout the year. In 2019 Morson will celebrate half a century in business. To honour this land mark we have embarked on a programme of events, with charity and community at the heart. During the next 12 months we plan for every office worldwide across the Group to take part, nominating a charity in that region to support. Closer to home we are embarking to help the local community as part of our ’50 Weeks of Giving’ programme by providing donations each week to help schools, homeless shelters, elderly care homes, youth projects, animal welfare shelters and many other institutions in the Manchester area, beginning in January. In addition we will be working to raise money for our 2019 employee-chosen charities, Motor Neurone Disease Association and ABF The Soldier’s Charity. As part of the Armed Forces Covenant and a recipient of the Ministry of Defence Gold Award one of our charity nominations this year reflects our continued work towards helping ex-forces veterans into civilian careers. Through this activity we aim to have our best ever year of fundraising, giving £500,000 throughout the year and surpassing the record of £160,000 raised in 2016. In the last 10 years we've raised over £2million for worthy causes throughout the UK such as Salford University, the Seashell Trust, Destination Florida and Alzheimer's Society. Morson Group was formed by Gerry Mason, the late father of our current CEO Ged Mason, in the family home in Salford in 1969. Since formation, the head office of the company has never moved more than two miles away from its original location. We now occupy state-of-the-art premises on Centenary Way on the banks of the Manchester Ship Canal, and this relationship with the local area is something that we are keen to celebrate throughout the year. “Manchester has always been a fantastic and vibrant place to conduct business. From our first office at our family home, to our current corporate headquarters, we have enjoyed working within the diverse and exciting business culture Manchester provides and we are proud of our roots.” - Ged Mason, CEO Growing to become the third largest technical recruiter in the world and the UK’s leading aerospace and rail recruiter, turning over more than £900million, we have a proud history, providing talent to many major engineering projects such as Channel Tunnel, Crossrail, Airbus A380, A350 and Eurofighter aircraft as well as nuclear power stations Sellafield and Sizewell. To mark our land mark anniversary we will be releasing a commemorative book which will chart both the history of the business as well as the growth and development of Manchester itself with interviews and features from several famous Mancunians – many of whom are associated with Morson. A digital time capsule will amplify the celebration of our achievements through an immersive online experience, which will take the user through the company's past, present and future. Both of these initiatives will bring together Morson’s sporting ambassadors; from horse racing, to ex-Manchester United players, to former world champion boxers Ricky Hatton and Anthony Crolla and the newly-crowned WBA super middleweight world champion Callum Smith, to Sale Sharks and more. To give back to the people who make Morson a success, a celebration event in July will bring our employees from all over the world together. Ged is keen to take the opportunity of our 50th year to reflect on how the business has grown and look forward to the future. “It’s great to live up to the company core value of giving and sprinkling some star dust where we can. I'm very proud of the Morson family and where we are now. As much as we are looking back when we celebrate our birthday, it's important that we look forward and keep driving on, at all times remembering that our greatest asset is our people. As my father used to say, 'there is no finish line, and that is the challenge.'” Morson have been re-thinking recruitment since 1969. Click here to find your next opportunity with us. For the latest updates on our 50th celebrations follow us @MorsonGroup #WeAre50

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