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About Us

Charity

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MORSON CHARITY ACTIVITY 2017 | From bike rides to sky dives, take a look at what we got up to in 2017 >

As one of our Core Values, charity is of fundamental importance to Morson and over the last decade we have raised hundreds of thousands for dozens of charitable organisations across the country.

In 2019 Morson will celebrate half a century in business. To honour this land mark we have embarked on a programme of events, with charity and community at the heart. During the next 12 months we plan for every office worldwide across the Group to take part, nominating a charity in that region to support. Closer to home we are embarking to help the local community as part of our ’50 Weeks of Giving’ programme by providing donations each week to help schools, homeless shelters, elderly care homes, youth projects, animal welfare shelters and many other institutions in the Manchester area, beginning in January. Read more about our progress here >

The Morson Charity Committee was founded in 2007, and each year our employees vote to select two charitable organisations to raise vital funds for - one local organisation and one national. The nomination of a local charity often stems from the personal experience of an employee and Morson is proud to support and promote awareness of a worthwhile cause in our region.

Our fundraising efforts are driven by our employees and the Charity Committee. In 2017, we raised £110,000 for The Christie and Alzheimer's Society through a golf day, our annual bike ride, cake sales, raffles, a skydive and much more.

“Its been another incredibly successful year of fundraising once again. This year has been great because we’ve seen a number of new events that we’ve not done before and they’ve all been a huge success, raising thousands of pounds for great causes.” David Robinson | Chairman of the Charity Committee

Our 2019 employee-chosen charities are the Motor Neurone Disease Association and ABF The Soldier’s Charity.  As part of the Armed Forces Covenant and a recipient of the Ministry of Defence Gold Award one of our charity nominations this year reflects our continued work towards helping ex-forces veterans into civilian careers.  Through this activity we aim to have our best ever year of fundraising, giving £500,000 throughout the year and surpassing the record of £160,000 raised in 2016. In the last 10 years we've raised over £2million for worthy causes throughout the UK such as Salford University, the Seashell TrustDestination Florida and Alzheimer's Society

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Morson Sport | #TeamMorson

In 2017,  continued to champion #TeamMorson in their athletic endeavours with key sponsorships of boxers, golfers, sports teams and jockeys. Visit Morson Sport for exclusive interviews and videos with our sports stars like Anthony Crolla, Callum Smith, Paul Nicholls Stables and Sale Sharks. For the latest breaking news, keep up to date on Twitter @MorsonGroup

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    Morson Yeovil Aid Leonardo UK Fundraising Effort

    MORSON NEWS | 3 MIN READ Morson Technical Services in Yeovil take part in charity fundraiser with Leonardo UK Funds raised went to the Armed Forces Para-Snowsport Team Morson’s onsite team in Yeovil were proud to play an important role in a major fundraising effort with Leonardo UK. The Morson Technical Services team, who are onsite with Leonardo UK in Yeovil helped the business raise £46,000 for the Armed Forces Para Snowsport Team (AFPST) by supporting the Ride of Steel Challenge 2019. Leonardo UK has supported the AFPST, who play a powerful role in the recovery of injured and sick serving personnel and veterans through sporting activity, for ten years. The Ride of Steel 2019 saw 20 riders cycle 232 miles to Sheffield, 7 riders from Basildon cycled 238 miles over 4 days, a team of 12 riders from Luton and Lincoln cycled more than 180 miles to Sheffield in three days, 7 cyclists travelled the 220-mile ride from Southampton and two more the 200 miles from Bristol. On the final day, all riders arrived together for the opening ceremony of the UK Invictus Games Trials in Sheffield. Clare Brister and Ruth House from MTS at Yeovil helped with the logistics of moving the cyclists and their kit for the duration of the journey while Tony Beaumont took part in the cycle challenge. He commented on Morson’s support: “We’re all really proud to have been involved in this amazing and uplifting experience. Clare and Ruth were amazing and gave up their weekend to support the challenge. They both deserve medals!” Charity is one of Morson’s core values. Coupled with core charity activity, Morson aims to raise and donate £500,000 in total throughout the year in celebration of 50 years in business. Core charity activity has seen us work to raise money for the employee-chosen charities in 2019 - Motor Neurone Disease Association and ABF The Soldier’s Charity. In the last 10 years, over £2million has been raised for worthy causes throughout the UK such as the Seashell Trust and Destination Florida. Morson has also embarked on a program of donation called '50 Weeks of Giving', in which local organisations receive funds each week throughout the year. To find out more about how Morson supports local charities, click here. Looking to progress your career? Search Morson jobs now.

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    Salford Foundation Among Five Beneficiaries In July | 50 Weeks Of Giving

    CHARITY | 2 MIN READ Morson donates to five organisations throughout July 50 Weeks Of Giving celebrates Morson's 50th anniversary in business Morson continued its ’50 Weeks Of Giving’ programme with a combined donation of £3,250 to five organisations throughout the month of July. Monton Unitarian Church benefitted from a £1,000 donation to help towards an easy access project for disabled access to the church. A further £500 was donated to the Children’s Burns Unit at Manchester Children’s Hospital. Morson has previously assisted the hospital in 2014 when a donation of £30,000 was made to fund the refurbishment of the Teen Zone and the purchase of an MRI Compatible Incubator Pod. Boothstown Football Club in Worsley benefitted from a £250 donation. The club us an FA Charter Standard Community Club that caters for the growing population of children, young people and adults from the surrounding area. With 400 registered players, they offer places for children from 6 years of age. £1,000 was donated to the Salford Foundation, which provides a wide array of opportunities to help young people fulfil their potential through mentoring and projects. They also help local businesses engage with the local community and people. A further donation of £500 was made to the RSPCA. Our '50 Weeks of Giving' programme has seen us provide an individual donation each week to help worthy causes in the region. Coupled with our core annual charity activity, we aim to raise and donate £500,000 in total as we celebrate our 50th year in business. Some of the other organisations to benefit from the 50 Weeks of Giving programme include Cornerstone, Manchester Settlement and Wythenshawe Hospital. Our core charity activity will see us work to raise money for the employee-chosen charities in 2019, Motor Neurone Disease Association and ABF The Soldier's Charity. In the last 10 years we've raised over £2million for worthy causes throughout the UK such as the Seashell Trust and Destination Florida. Charity and community are at the heart of everything we do. Find out more

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    Breaking News! | Morson Inspired by Employee to Donate to The Brittle Bone Society

    50 WEEKS OF GIVING | 5 MIN READ As part of Morson’s 50th anniversary celebrations in 2019, we have embarked on a ’50 Weeks of Giving’ programme, donating money each week to various local and national causes. Morson’s Content Marketing Executive, Jessica Tabinor has been the inspiration for our latest donation. Jess lives with Osteogenesis Imperfecta, a genetic bone disorder, more commonly known as brittle bones. Affecting a person born with it throughout their lifetime, it is characterised by fragile bones which break easily. We spoke to Jess about living and working with brittle bones, found out how the Brittle Bone Society has helped her from an early age and why she wanted to help. What were your early years with brittle bones like? When I was born I broke my femur, my collarbone and ribs. I wouldn’t stop crying so they sent my medical information to Great Ormond Street Hospital in London and within 48 hours they told my parents that I had brittle bones. I broke a lot when I was younger, for the first 12 months of my life they carried me around on a pillow! OI is a disorder of collagen, a protein which forms the framework for the bone structure. In OI the collagen may be of poor quality, or there just may not be enough to support the mineral structure of the bones. This makes the bones weak and fragile and results in the bones being liable to fracture at any time, even without trauma. What has been the most difficult break/operation you’ve ever had? My back operation was the worst operation I’ve ever had. Due to the brittle bones, I’ve also got scoliosis (curvature of the spine) and when I was 11 I went for a check-up and the progression of the curvature had gotten so bad in just one year that they got me in for emergency spinal surgery. It’s a massive operation due to it being on your spinal cord, they fuse your spine, put a rod down the middle and then put screws on all of your vertebrae. It took about a year to fully recover from that one. How was life at school, and latterly work? It was sometimes difficult at school because I had a lot of fractures as I was growing up, so I had to have a lot of time off. I ended up having to teach myself a lot of subjects! I broke my femur just before taking my GCSE exams and my surgeon was on holiday, so I had to stay in hospital and wait for him to come back to put me back together again! Fortunately, throughout my career, my various employers have always been really supportive of my condition and that’s certainly the case at Morson. As soon as I joined they provide me with a laptop for when I’m feeling particularly achy or have a fracture, so I can work from home when needed. When I first started working here, the CEO Ged Mason came up to me to introduce himself and made it known that if there was anything that I needed to better accommodate my wheelchair, it would be taken care of. It’s great to have that kind of support around you. The Brittle Bone Society work towards improving the quality of life for people diagnosed with OI by providing emotional support, signposting and information, financial help for wheelchairs and equipment, and raising awareness of the condition. To find out more about the Brittle Bone Society, click here. How did the Brittle Bone Society help you? When I found out that we were doing the 50 Weeks of Giving initiative it felt only right to put forward the Brittle Bone Society. They have done so much for me over the years and I wouldn’t be where I am now without their support. They provided me with walking aids, wheelchairs, you name it. When I was first born they even sent my parents specially adapted Velcro clothes that were easier to dress me in and specially designed seats to teach me how to sit up for myself. My parents also received lots of advice from Margaret Grant, founder of the Society and she put them in touch with other families who had children with the same condition which was a massive help. Very kindly, Morson CEO, Ged offered to fund 50 kids packs which are given to children who are in hospital recovering from a fracture or operation. The kid's packs contain essentials such as wet wipes but also a variety of things to keep them entertained such as colouring books and teddy bears. Coupled with our core charity activity, we aim to raise and donate £500,000 in total as we celebrate our 50th year in business. Our core charity activity has seen us work to raise money for the employee-chosen charities in 2019 - Motor Neurone Disease Association and ABF The Soldier’s Charity. In the last 10 years, we’ve raised over £2million for worthy causes throughout the UK such as the Seashell Trust and Destination Florida. Stay up to date and find out more about our 50 Weeks of Giving charity initiative as we celebrate 50 years in business here.

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    Morson sponsor Wilderness Navigators' Mount Elbrus challenge

    MORSON NEWS | 3 MIN READ Morson sponsor veterans challenge for mental health and PTSD Wilderness Navigators team aim to summit Mount Elbrus in Russia. As part of our 50 weeks of giving, Morson Group is delighted to sponsor the Wilderness Navigators’ Mount Elbrus challenge, being undertaken by two forces veterans to raise money for mental health and PTSD. Taking place in September 2019, the challenge will see two forces veterans, Jake Gardner and Samuel Dean, attempt to climb the highest summit in Europe. Passionate about climbing, Jake served in Afghanistan in 15 Sqn as a Royal Air Force Regiment Gunner. It was during Herrick 17 that he was injured in 2013, resulting in his medical discharge in February 2015. A leader and navigator, fellow climber Sam Dean served alongside Jake in Afghanistan with 15 Sqn and has since served in multiple countries around the world. He speaks to Morson about the story behind the challenge: “We set up Wilderness Navigators with the main vision of delivering hiking and climbing experiences to groups offering support and guidance to encourage a healthier lifestyle. We want to engage people from all walks of life so they can combat their personal goals, particularly in ways close to us being veterans – mental health and PTSD.” For their newest feat, the pair will be joined by another veteran climber and will attempt to summit Mount Elbrus. One of the fabled Seven Summits and with an elevation of 5,000m, the dormant volcano of Mount Elbrus sits in the Caucasus Mountains in Southern Russia near the border with Georgia. “We don’t have a specific charity but for the Mount Elbrus challenge we’ve partnered with a charity called Rock 2 Recovery which is a veteran’s charity for mental health and PTSD.” Ticking off Mount Elbrus is a step towards a bigger challenge for the climbers: “Long term we want to do all of the Seven Summits, with Everest the main one. Jake has already climbed Aconcagua [Andes, Argentina] but we chose this one now because it’s affordable without a major corporate sponsor and it’s within our skillset.” The journey will begin with a flight from London to Moscow followed by a connecting flight a couple of days later to the mountain range. Between the 1st and 8th September the team will spend time acclimatising to the are before attempting a summit. “Which day we do it will depend on the weather, but we’re hoping we can make it in the middle of that period, maybe the 4th. We’ll be going up the west summit. All being well, we should be back in England for 11th September." Our '50 Weeks of Giving' programme has seen us provide an individual donation each week to help worthy causes in the region. Coupled with our core annual charity activity, we aim to raise and donate £500,000 in total as we celebrate our 50th year in business. Our core charity activity will see us work to raise money for the employee-chosen charities in 2019, Motor Neurone Disease Association and ABF The Soldier's Charity. In the last 10 years we've raised over £2million for worthy causes throughout the UK such as the Seashell Trust and Destination Florida. Everyone at Morson wishes the Wilderness Navigators team the very best of luck for their trip. Follow us on Twitter to check in the with the climbers. Currently, Morson Forces has in excess of 2,500 ex-military contract and permanent staff from the Royal Navy, Army and RAF, working across a variety of client projects in the UK and overseas. Search our forces friendly jobs here.

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    Morson donate to five charities in September | 50 Weeks of Giving

    CHARITY | 3 MIN READ Morson's 50 Weeks of Giving continues throughout September Weekly donations celebrate 50 years in business for the Morson Group Morson has donated to five local charities through the month of September. Totalling £2,650, the donations are part of the '50 Weeks of Giving' campaign being run by the business throughout 2019 to celebrate 50 years in business. Maintaining the business' commitment to helping ex-forces charities and veterans, the first donation of £250 was for SSAFA, an armed forces charity. Paul Quick, a Morson employee based at Wattisham took part in a bike ride to mark the 75th anniversary of the D-Day landings. A donation of £1,000 was made to the Clatterbridge Cancer Charity based in Birkenhead via a skydive by Robert Rose, operations director of Morson client Encirc. Last year, work began on building Liverpool's first cancer hospital in the heard of the city backed by their £15m appeal. One of Morson's longest serving charity partners is the Seashell Trust, and head of fundraising Dominic Tinner has been taking part in a Swiss Alp Cycle Challenge - four days of gruelling cycling between Geneva and Zurich across 310 miles with 25,000ft of climbing. Morson donated £200 to the cause and proceeds will go to the Seashell Trust to help provide the necessary funds for adapted bikes and a host of specialist equipment. Katie's Ski Tracks is a charity that takes disadvantaged children with life-threatening or life-limiting medical conditions. They've been the beneficiaries of a donation of £1,000 towards their next trip. A final donation rounded out the month, with £200 being donated to CLIC Sargent, a charity for young lives vs cancer. The donation was made through our connection with the local branch of Morrisons in Eccles. Our 50 Weeks of Giving programme will be in addition to the work to raise money for the employee-chosen charities in 2019, Motor Neurone Disease Assosication and ABF The Soldier's Charity. In the last 10 years, we've raised over £2million for worthy causes throughout the UK such as the Seashell Trust, Destination Florida, Salford University, Alzheimer's Society and MIND. Celebrations throughout the year have bought together Morson's sporting ambassadors; from horse racing, to ex-Manchester United players, to former world champion boxers Ricky Hatton and Anthony Crolla and Sale Sharks rugby club. Find out more about our commitment to charity here

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    Morson London donate £1,000 to nine employee-chosen charities | 50 Weeks of Giving

    CHARITY | 3 MIN READ Morson London split £1,000 between nine charities Employees nominated charities with personal significance to recieve the donations Morson London have made donations totalling over £1,000 to nine charities as part of the company’s 50 Weeks of Giving programme. Morson provided one of our London branches, located at Southwark Street, £1,000 to distribute between several charities close to the hearts of employees. This forms part of a larger campaign throughout the year in which each branch of the Morson Group has been given a set amount of money to donate to local charities. Jay Dassrath elected to donate £200 to the Neuromuscular Disease Foundation for research towards GNE myopathy, a very rare genetic condition for which there is no known cure that causes muscles in the arms and legs to become increasingly weak and waste away. The C9 Addenbrookes Cancer Charity is a trust based in Cambridge. Morson’s Lee Walker has a personal connection with the charity with them looking after his daughter over the past three years. He elected to donate £200 to the organisation in support of their work. In 2013, Russell Kimble was diagnosed with Necrotising Fasciitis which led to sepsis, a severely life threatening condition. He pulled through, but suffers from PTSD as a result and has spent time working very closely with the Sepsis Trust, volunteering and teaching nursing staff about mental trauma. £200 was donated to this charity and the money will go towards investing in more counsellors, physiotherapists and mental heath experts. The final £200 donation was made to Guy’s and St Thomas Cancer Charity. An independent charitable foundation, it works with the NHS Foundation Trust to provide support for people with cancer. Ollie Egbeyemi’s mother was diagnosed with the brain cancer Glioblastoma, and the charity provided aftercare and treatment for her post-surgery. Phil Johnson nominated St Christopher’s Hospice, who looked after his terminally ill father. The charity, based in London, were the beneficiaries of a £50 donation. Another similar charity who benefitted from a £50 donation was Greenwich & Bexley Community Hospice, who looked after Mat Owen’s mother in law during her final few weeks before passing away. The hospice relies heavily on donations to continue their work. British Heart Foundation also received £50. The father of Morson’s Grant Evans underwent a successful unexpected triple heart bypass in 2018. Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is a very rare terminal lung disease predominantly effecting women in their child-bearing years. For every one million women, approximately seven will get diagnosed with the illness, for which there currently is no known cure. LAM Action is a charity that supports patients with the illness, and benefitted from a £50 donation from Oliver Wingrave, whose sister lives with the illness. The final £50 donation was made to The Albany Taxi Charity, started in 1972 by a group of London Licensed Taxi Drivers with the aim of taking some special needs children for a day out at the seaside. It continues to run, and Dave Nicholas nominated them for a donation. Morson’s 50 Weeks of Giving programme will be in addition to the work to raise money for the employee-chosen charities in 2019, Motor Neurone Disease Association and ABF The Soldier's Charity. In the last 10 years, we've raised over £2million for worthy causes throughout the UK such as the Seashell Trust, Destination Florida, Salford University, Alzheimer's Society and MIND. Celebrations throughout the year have bought together Morson's sporting ambassadors; from horse racing, to ex-Manchester United players, to former world champion boxers Ricky Hatton and Anthony Crolla and Sale Sharks rugby club. Morson's 50th anniversary has seen a record year of fundraising. Read more about our 50 Weeks of Giving here

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    Success for Morson-sponsored Mount Elbrus challenge veterans

    CHARITY | 3 MIN READ Success for Morson-sponsored veterans challenge for mental health and PTSD Jake Gardner recalls the journey and looks to his next challenge Morson Group recently sponsored the successfully completed Wilderness Navigators’ Mount Elbrus challenge, undertaken by two forces veterans to raise money for mental health and PTSD. Taking place in September 2019, the challenge saw two forces veterans, Jake Gardner and Samuel Dean, attempt to climb the highest summit in Europe. One of the fabled Seven Summits and with an elevation of 5,000m, the dormant volcano of Mount Elbrus sits in the Caucasus Mountains in Southern Russia near the border with Georgia. Passionate about climbing, Jake served in Afghanistan in 15 Sqn as a Royal Air Force Regiment Gunner. It was during Herrick 17 that he was injured in 2013, resulting in his medical discharge in February 2015. A leader and navigator, Sam Dean served alongside Jake in Afghanistan with 15 Sqn and has since served in multiple countries around the world. Morson spoke to Jake about the climb and his goals for the future: “It went really well. We spent six or seven days at 3,800m acclimatising in the surrounding area. It was a nice slow program. The weather window was perfect for us, the team gelled well and we all had a good time. On summit day, we set off around 2am and managed to reach the West peak at around 11am. I’d say we were doing around 3mph on average, but we were overtaking other groups of climbers.” Having summited one of the taller Seven Summits in 2017, Aconcagua in Argentina, Jake found himself more used to the tough undertaking: “The actual climb itself was really tough on a couple of the team. I’d been to altitude before but the other two guys, Deano and Tom, struggled. At that altitude, the air is so much thinner which makes breathing more difficult. Tom in particular, he’d been injured in the armed forces with a gunshot wound to the chest. Fortunately, we had two guides so one could stay with him if he slowed down. There were a couple of point where we weren’t sure we were all going to get there.” Despite the struggles, the whole team managed to reach the peak in good time, and Jake took part in a bonus mini-expedition to the other of the two peaks: “I managed to get to East and West peaks on the same day which was amazing. When we reached the top of the West peak the guide mentioned the prospect of doing the East one too which I did. Once the other guys got to the top they went back down almost straight away. But they’ve learned a lot moving forwards in terms of physical fitness and coping with altitude.” Not ones to rest easy after this undertaking, eyes have already moved towards the next of the Summits to tick off the list. “For me, it’s Everest next, the big one. I’ve been in talks with a company to do it in 2021. If possible, I’d like to squeeze Kilimanjaro in next year too.” Preparing for Mount Everest would prove to be a much more intense undertaking than Mount Elbrus. Climbers can expect to spend six or seven weeks in the Everest region, acclimatising and preparing to ascend the 8,848m mountain. Jake has eyes on another endurance challenge in the near future, which Morson will also be sponsoring. Check back on the blog soon to find out more. Currently, Morson Forces has in excess of 2,500 ex-military contract and permanent staff from the Royal Navy, Army and RAF, working across a variety of client projects in the UK and overseas. Search our forces friendly jobs here

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    Morson sponsors veteran in Jordan Ultra Marathon

    CHARITY | 3 MIN READ Following the successful Wilderness Challenge, veteran Jake takes on marathon challenge with Morson sponsorship The Wadi Rum Ultra Marathon takes place in Jordan Morson Group recently sponsored the Wilderness Navigators’ Mount Elbrus challenge, undertaken by two forces veterans to raise money for mental health and PTSD. Following the successfully completed expedition, we are delighted to be supporting one of the participants in their next challenge. Armed forces veteran Jake Gardner will be taking part in the Wadi Rum Ultra Marathon in Aqaba, Jordan. Comprising 155 miles over five days, the Ultra Marathon takes place every year across sand dunes, dried up river beds and valleys. “The longest stint of the marathon is the Wednesday, which is around 70km. The tough thing, apart from the distance, is going to be the heat. It’s probably going to be somewhere between 32 and 35 degrees throughout.” Jake will also be battled against an old injury, one that he sustained in 2013 while serving with 15Sqn as a Royal Air Force Regiment Gunner in Afghanistan. This resulted in his medical discharge in 2015: “My left arm essentially snapped in half. I’ve had quite a few issues with my lower back too. For training, I’ve been doing mobility stretches twice a day and if I run slower than 8 minutes a mile then I’m OK. That’s why I wanted to do the Ultra Marathon.” Over the past few months, Jake has juggled training for two very different challenges, but found ways to combine the two: “Training has been incorporating the training for the Wilderness and for the Marathon and sort of fitting them around each other. Running in Wales, the Brecon Beacons, Snowdonia. It’s the best of both worlds for the two experiences.” Jake has elected to raise money for a foundation that provides relief to those in need with a physical and mental disability or long-term illness. “The charity I’m doing it for is The AGS Foundation. The reason for choosing them is because they’ve done a lot for me previously with being injured in Afghanistan. I did Aconcagua with them for the Adaptive Grand Slam. They were the guys who got me properly into mountaineering.” Jake flew out to Jordan on 5th October and begins his challenge on the 7th. “Fundraising target is £200 but anything more would be fantastic. I’ve already squeezed relatives and friends from the Wilderness!” All at Morson wish him the very best of luck! Check back soon to find out how the experience was. Click here to make a donation Currently, Morson Forces has in excess of 2,500 ex-military contract and permanent staff from the Royal Navy, Army and RAF, working across a variety of client projects in the UK and overseas. Search our forces friendly jobs here.

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    Five days, 155 gruelling miles... Morson-sponsored forces veteran completes Ultra Marathon Challenge

    MORSON NEWS | 4 MIN READ Morson-sponsored ex-forces veteran completes gruelling 155 mile Ultra Marathon in Jordan. Jake Gardner also recently completed a summit of Mount Elbrus in Russia Following our recent sponsorship of the Wilderness Navigators’ Mount Elbrus challenge, we were delighted to sponsor one of its participants in an extreme marathon challenge successfully completed in early October in Jordan. The Wadi Rum Ultra Marathon in Aqaba, Jordan, comprises 155 miles over five days. Competitors can expect to face sand dunes and temperatures reaching as high as 35 degrees throughout the course of the run, which took place between 7th and 11th October. We caught up with our sponsored competitor Jake Gardner for him to talk us through the race. “When I woke up on 6th October, the realisation of the enormity and seriousness of the challenge finally kicked in. This was my first ever running event. Three months of preparation with the Mount Elbrus summit in the middle with my longest run being 25 miles and it all came to this, departure day. The last pack is always an unnecessary panic, thinking you’re ready and then realising you might have forgotten something… and it was a sad goodbye to my ever-supportive wife.” Two days after his flight to Jordan, Jake was ready to tackle day one of the race, a 46km run and the third longest of the five days. “I basically got no sleep but I rested well. I did a bit of stretching and some mobility exercises and had scrambled eggs and a coffee. Then it was time for the off on a beautiful morning. The pace was fast at the beginning but comfortable and I found a rhythm. By 26km it was starting to get very hot and I was running with a Marine, an army guy and a man from Coasta Rica called Quentin. They were all seasoned athletes. As the run went on I began to slow down and use my sticks. Between 30km and 46km was a massive, massive struggle. I finally finish within 5 hours feeling exhausted, sick and dizzy.” The rest of the day was spent resting, eating and hydrating. The next day would prove to be even more of a challenge for Jake – 50km, the furthest he had ever run up to that point. “I was up at 4:30am for this leg. At the start line my back is starting to flare up. By the time I hit the 18km point I hit a wall and from then on it got worse. I slowed down dramatically, walking at times and enjoying the view. The most challenging factors were existing injuries, nausea and the relentless heat. I finally came in around 7 hours 30 minutes." The challenge was far from over. The longest day, day three, lay immediately ahead, following a short rest and a 2am wake up. “I started out slow in the dark which was nice because it was cooler, but it was hard, hard work. The support crew were incredible though. It was 34 degrees in the shade! I ended it in pure agony after about 16 hours and 30 minutes. Some team members walked to the finish with me for the last kilometre. The penultimate day would see another 44km, and after getting in late in the day, Jake had less rest than some of the other competitors. “I was destroyed after the day before, but not defeated! I had a strategy today, knowing that my back would flare up so there was an osteopath at each checkpoint. I made it home in 40th place, and there were 19 who didn’t finish.” The final day arrived for Jake after another tough night’s sleep and another early rise at 5am. The final day was about getting to the end and Jake was keen to be setting off. “The views as always were unforgettable. I set off at a reasonably quick pace to make up some sort of time window in the first 10/20km which worked well the day before and there was more shade today in the canyon in the morning. I walked a reasonable chunk of the course but made it back in in around 7 hours with the crew and team cheering, which was incredible. It was very emotional and when I crossed the line I was exhausted mentally and physically. It was an emotional and unforgettable experience.” ​All at Morson congratulate Jake on his amazing achievement, and look forward to being involved in his future ventures. Currently, Morson Forces has in excess of 2,500 ex-military contract and permanent staff from the Royal Navy, Army and RAF, working across a variety of client projects in the UK and overseas. Search our forces friendly jobs here.

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