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Why am I not getting a job? Find out now…

Rebekah Valero-Lee Candidate Hub

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Here are six reasons ‘why’ you’re just not getting that all important offer.

1) Your CV

Maybe you can’t even get past the first hurdle and get an interview, especially with recruiters spending just nine seconds reading each CV – so it’s important to get it up to scratch. CV’s showcase your abilities and qualifications but the main thing is to make it all relevant to the sector you’re applying to. Whilst employers are reading your CV, they’re seeing if you’d be a fit. Read the job specification and description carefully and integrate the main points into your CV, without making it too lengthy.

2) Job Hopping

Sometimes employers may be disheartened if you’ve worked in numerous organisations as it questions company loyalty. However, others see this as a strength, as it highlights adaptability and varied experience. Unlike in previous generations, younger workers today are more likely to change roles or employers every few years rather than stay in one company for decades making Job-hopping increasingly common in the UK.

3) Long-term Unemployment

We all know the saying ‘it’s more difficult to find a role when you’re unemployed’. That and the stigma attached to those who haven’t worked for over a year produces self-doubt and frustration when either applying for a role or at an interview. But there are ways to try and get back on your feet. For instance, upskilling by taking a course, volunteering, getting a mentor or just being upfront when an employer asks about a CV gap can all make a significant difference. Don’t forget to write this all in your cover letter.

4) Overqualified

It’s hard to overcome the ‘Overqualified Label’ but here’s how to change a prospective employers mind on both your CV and in your interview. Try to focus more on skills and accomplishments rather than job titles, take your salary of the table and demonstrate loyalty. All of those factors should highlight that although you may be classed as overqualified, the company will undoubtedly benefit from hiring you.

5) Interview

An interview can make or break a job offer. Think carefully about why you want the role and what the employers are really looking for and ensure you do interview preparation. When the interviewer asks ‘what can you tell us about the company?’ Make sure you’ve done your research. Then after the interview, think back – have you been enthusiastic? Showcased your industry knowledge? Or been clear about your career goals? One thing to remember is all experience is good experience.

6) Better Fit

Finally, a common reason is maybe somebody just suits the role better than you. There may have been 10 people interviewed and only one can get the job. So, although you ticked all the boxes, only one position is available and sometimes a deciding factor is compatibility with the team or personality. So, don’t beat yourself up about it if you’re not successful. Make sure you get some feedback, learn from it, stop thinking too much ‘why am I not getting a job?’ and then get your game face ready for your next interview.

If you’re looking to start your career in engineering or see what’s out there, check out our latest jobs here.

Also, get ahead of the trends and  check out how the recruitment space is looking for both employers and job seekers this year, here.

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